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Systemic Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) infection in bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) through feeding and injection

Haidong Wang, Ivan Meeus UGent, Niels Piot UGent and Guy Smagghe UGent (2018) JOURNAL OF INVERTEBRATE PATHOLOGY. 151. p.158-164
abstract
Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) can cause a systemic infection, resulting in mortality in both Apis and Bombus spp. bees. However, little is known about the virus infection dynamics within bee tissues. Here, we established systemic IAPV infections in reared bumblebee Bombus terrestris workers through feeding and injection and investigated the mortality, tissue tropism and viral localization. Injection of approximately 500 IAPV (IAPV(inj) stock) particles resulted in acute infection, viral loads within tissues that were relatively stable from bee to bee, and a distinctive tissue tropism, making this method suitable for studying systemic IAPV infection in bumblebees. Feeding with approximately 1 x 10(6) particles of the same virus stock did not result in systemic infection. A high-concentration stock of IAPV (IAPV(fed) stock) allowed us to feed bumblebees with approximately 1 x 10(9) viral particles, which induced both chronic and acute infection. We also observed a higher variability in viral titers within tissues and less clear tissue tropism during systemic infection, making feeding with IAPV(fed) stock less optimal for studying IAPV systemic infection. Strikingly, both infection methods and stocks with different viral loads gave a similar viral localization pattern in the brain and midgut of bumblebees with an acute infection. The implications of these findings in the study of the local immunity in bees and barriers to oral transmission are discussed. Our data provide useful information on the establishment of a systemic viral infection in bees.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
IAPV, Bumblebee, Injection, Feeding, Tissues, Viral localization, NUCLEAR POLYHEDROSIS-VIRUS, KASHMIR BEE VIRUS, TRICHOPLUSIA-NI, APIS-MELLIFERA, BACTERIAL-INFECTION, VARROA-DESTRUCTOR, HOST-DEFENSE, HONEYBEE, RECEPTOR, LARVAE
journal title
JOURNAL OF INVERTEBRATE PATHOLOGY
J. Invertebr. Pathol.
volume
151
pages
158 - 164
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000424857300019
ISSN
0022-2011
DOI
10.1016/j.jip.2017.11.015
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
8543101
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8543101
date created
2017-12-22 13:40:13
date last changed
2018-05-16 10:29:10
@article{8543101,
  abstract     = {Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) can cause a systemic infection, resulting in mortality in both Apis and Bombus spp. bees. However, little is known about the virus infection dynamics within bee tissues. Here, we established systemic IAPV infections in reared bumblebee Bombus terrestris workers through feeding and injection and investigated the mortality, tissue tropism and viral localization. Injection of approximately 500 IAPV (IAPV(inj) stock) particles resulted in acute infection, viral loads within tissues that were relatively stable from bee to bee, and a distinctive tissue tropism, making this method suitable for studying systemic IAPV infection in bumblebees. Feeding with approximately 1 x 10(6) particles of the same virus stock did not result in systemic infection. A high-concentration stock of IAPV (IAPV(fed) stock) allowed us to feed bumblebees with approximately 1 x 10(9) viral particles, which induced both chronic and acute infection. We also observed a higher variability in viral titers within tissues and less clear tissue tropism during systemic infection, making feeding with IAPV(fed) stock less optimal for studying IAPV systemic infection. Strikingly, both infection methods and stocks with different viral loads gave a similar viral localization pattern in the brain and midgut of bumblebees with an acute infection. The implications of these findings in the study of the local immunity in bees and barriers to oral transmission are discussed. Our data provide useful information on the establishment of a systemic viral infection in bees.},
  author       = {Wang, Haidong and Meeus, Ivan and Piot, Niels and Smagghe, Guy},
  issn         = {0022-2011},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF INVERTEBRATE PATHOLOGY},
  keyword      = {IAPV,Bumblebee,Injection,Feeding,Tissues,Viral localization,NUCLEAR POLYHEDROSIS-VIRUS,KASHMIR BEE VIRUS,TRICHOPLUSIA-NI,APIS-MELLIFERA,BACTERIAL-INFECTION,VARROA-DESTRUCTOR,HOST-DEFENSE,HONEYBEE,RECEPTOR,LARVAE},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {158--164},
  title        = {Systemic Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) infection in bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) through feeding and injection},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jip.2017.11.015},
  volume       = {151},
  year         = {2018},
}

Chicago
Wang, Haidong, Ivan Meeus, Niels Piot, and Guy Smagghe. 2018. “Systemic Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV) Infection in Bumblebees (Bombus Terrestris) Through Feeding and Injection.” Journal of Invertebrate Pathology 151: 158–164.
APA
Wang, Haidong, Meeus, I., Piot, N., & Smagghe, G. (2018). Systemic Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) infection in bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) through feeding and injection. JOURNAL OF INVERTEBRATE PATHOLOGY, 151, 158–164.
Vancouver
1.
Wang H, Meeus I, Piot N, Smagghe G. Systemic Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) infection in bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) through feeding and injection. JOURNAL OF INVERTEBRATE PATHOLOGY. 2018;151:158–64.
MLA
Wang, Haidong, Ivan Meeus, Niels Piot, et al. “Systemic Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV) Infection in Bumblebees (Bombus Terrestris) Through Feeding and Injection.” JOURNAL OF INVERTEBRATE PATHOLOGY 151 (2018): 158–164. Print.