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Emerging trends in 'smart probiotics' : functional consideration for the development of novel health and industrial applications

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Abstract
The link between gut microbiota and human health is well-recognized and described. This ultimate impact on the host has contributed to explain the mutual dependence between humans and their gut bacteria. Gut microbiota can be manipulated through passive or active strategies. The former includes diet, lifestyle, and environment, while the latter comprise antibiotics, pre- and probiotics. Historically, conventional probiotic strategies included a phylogenetically limited diversity of bacteria and some yeast strains. However, biotherapeutic strategies evolved in the last years with the advent of fecal microbiota transplant (FMT), successfully applied for treating CDI, IBD, and other diseases. Despite the positive outcomes, long-term effects resulting from the uncharacterized nature of FMT are not sufficiently studied. Thus, developing strategies to simulate the FMT, using characterized gut colonizers with identified phylogenetic diversity, may be a promising alternative. As the definition of probiotics states that the microorganism should have beneficial effects on the host, several bacterial species with proven efficacy have been considered next generation probiotics. Non-conventional candidate strains include Akkermansia muciniphila, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Bacteroides fragilis, and members of the Clostridia clusters IV, XIVa, and XVIII. However, viable intestinal delivery is one of the current challenges, due to their stringent survival conditions. In this review, we will cover current perspectives on the development and assessment of next generation probiotics and the approaches that industry and stakeholders must consider for a successful outcome.
Keywords
FMT, next generation probiotics, bacterial consortium, synthetic community, CDI, CLOSTRIDIUM-DIFFICILE INFECTION, FECAL MICROBIOTA TRANSPLANTATION, INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC ASSOCIATION, GUT MICROBIOTA, INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA, IMMUNE-SYSTEM, FAECALIBACTERIUM-PRAUSNITZII, MULTISPECIES PROBIOTICS, GENERATION PROBIOTICS, CONSENSUS STATEMENT

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Citation

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Chicago
El Hage, Racha, Emma Hernandez Sanabria, and Tom Van de Wiele. 2017. “Emerging Trends in ‘Smart Probiotics’ : Functional Consideration for the Development of Novel Health and Industrial Applications.” Frontiers in Microbiology 8.
APA
El Hage, R., Hernandez Sanabria, E., & Van de Wiele, T. (2017). Emerging trends in “smart probiotics” : functional consideration for the development of novel health and industrial applications. FRONTIERS IN MICROBIOLOGY, 8.
Vancouver
1.
El Hage R, Hernandez Sanabria E, Van de Wiele T. Emerging trends in “smart probiotics” : functional consideration for the development of novel health and industrial applications. FRONTIERS IN MICROBIOLOGY. 2017;8.
MLA
El Hage, Racha, Emma Hernandez Sanabria, and Tom Van de Wiele. “Emerging Trends in ‘Smart Probiotics’ : Functional Consideration for the Development of Novel Health and Industrial Applications.” FRONTIERS IN MICROBIOLOGY 8 (2017): n. pag. Print.
@article{8542384,
  abstract     = {The link between gut microbiota and human health is well-recognized and described. This ultimate impact on the host has contributed to explain the mutual dependence between humans and their gut bacteria. Gut microbiota can be manipulated through passive or active strategies. The former includes diet, lifestyle, and environment, while the latter comprise antibiotics, pre- and probiotics. Historically, conventional probiotic strategies included a phylogenetically limited diversity of bacteria and some yeast strains. However, biotherapeutic strategies evolved in the last years with the advent of fecal microbiota transplant (FMT), successfully applied for treating CDI, IBD, and other diseases. Despite the positive outcomes, long-term effects resulting from the uncharacterized nature of FMT are not sufficiently studied. Thus, developing strategies to simulate the FMT, using characterized gut colonizers with identified phylogenetic diversity, may be a promising alternative. As the definition of probiotics states that the microorganism should have beneficial effects on the host, several bacterial species with proven efficacy have been considered next generation probiotics. Non-conventional candidate strains include Akkermansia muciniphila, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Bacteroides fragilis, and members of the Clostridia clusters IV, XIVa, and XVIII. However, viable intestinal delivery is one of the current challenges, due to their stringent survival conditions. In this review, we will cover current perspectives on the development and assessment of next generation probiotics and the approaches that industry and stakeholders must consider for a successful outcome.},
  articleno    = {1889},
  author       = {El Hage, Racha and Hernandez Sanabria, Emma and Van de Wiele, Tom},
  issn         = {1664-302X},
  journal      = {FRONTIERS IN MICROBIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {FMT,next generation probiotics,bacterial consortium,synthetic community,CDI,CLOSTRIDIUM-DIFFICILE INFECTION,FECAL MICROBIOTA TRANSPLANTATION,INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC ASSOCIATION,GUT MICROBIOTA,INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA,IMMUNE-SYSTEM,FAECALIBACTERIUM-PRAUSNITZII,MULTISPECIES PROBIOTICS,GENERATION PROBIOTICS,CONSENSUS STATEMENT},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {11},
  title        = {Emerging trends in 'smart probiotics' : functional consideration for the development of novel health and industrial applications},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2017.01889},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2017},
}

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