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Whom do customers blame for a service failure? Effects of thought speed on causal locus attribution

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Abstract
This research investigates the impact of customers' thought speeds in a service failure setting. Fast-thinking induces not only heuristic processing, but also positive affect. As both factors predict a different outcome on whom customers blame for the failure, this study examines rival hypotheses. Findings from three experiments show that fast-thinking leads respondents to attribute failures to the service providers (i.e., showing a selfserving bias). In addition, fast-thinking also has more downstream consequences, as it negatively affects repurchase intentions and positively affects intentions to spread negative word of mouth. Therefore, service providers are encouraged to stimulate slow thought during service encounters.
Keywords
Thought speed, Service failure, Causal attributions

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Chicago
Pacheco, Natalia Araujo, Maggie Geuens, and Cristiane Pizzutti. 2018. “Whom Do Customers Blame for a Service Failure? Effects of Thought Speed on Causal Locus Attribution.” Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services 40: 60–65.
APA
Pacheco, N. A., Geuens, M., & Pizzutti, C. (2018). Whom do customers blame for a service failure? Effects of thought speed on causal locus attribution. JOURNAL OF RETAILING AND CONSUMER SERVICES, 40, 60–65.
Vancouver
1.
Pacheco NA, Geuens M, Pizzutti C. Whom do customers blame for a service failure? Effects of thought speed on causal locus attribution. JOURNAL OF RETAILING AND CONSUMER SERVICES. 2018;40:60–5.
MLA
Pacheco, Natalia Araujo, Maggie Geuens, and Cristiane Pizzutti. “Whom Do Customers Blame for a Service Failure? Effects of Thought Speed on Causal Locus Attribution.” JOURNAL OF RETAILING AND CONSUMER SERVICES 40 (2018): 60–65. Print.
@article{8541926,
  abstract     = {This research investigates the impact of customers' thought speeds in a service failure setting. Fast-thinking induces not only heuristic processing, but also positive affect. As both factors predict a different outcome on whom customers blame for the failure, this study examines rival hypotheses. Findings from three experiments show that fast-thinking leads respondents to attribute failures to the service providers (i.e., showing a selfserving bias). In addition, fast-thinking also has more downstream consequences, as it negatively affects repurchase intentions and positively affects intentions to spread negative word of mouth. Therefore, service providers are encouraged to stimulate slow thought during service encounters.},
  author       = {Pacheco, Natalia Araujo and Geuens, Maggie and Pizzutti, Cristiane},
  issn         = {0969-6989},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF RETAILING AND CONSUMER SERVICES},
  keyword      = {Thought speed,Service failure,Causal attributions},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {60--65},
  title        = {Whom do customers blame for a service failure? Effects of thought speed on causal locus attribution},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.09.006},
  volume       = {40},
  year         = {2018},
}

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