Advanced search
1 file | 77.14 KB Add to list

The Good Samaritans? A critical race analysis of white middle-class families’ choice for ethnically diverse schools

(2016)
Author
Organization
Abstract
Traditionally, literature on school choice has asserted that most white middle-class fractions avoid ethnically diverse schools, as they are believed to hinder cognitive, personal and social development. Nonetheless some families value against the grain, and apply for ethnically diverse schools. The present contribution focuses on this intriguing phenomenon by examining the motives underlying these parents’ choice for diversity. In order to do this, we focus on a group of white middle-class gentrifiers in the context of Ghent (Belgium) of whom the children are enrolled in an ethnically diverse public school. Making an appeal to critical race theory, we suggest that the prevailing assumption, namely that these parents are disinterested selfless subjects who are solely putting their values into action, needs to be revisited. In fact, rather than driven by a framework of personal values, our analyses suggests that these parents mainly acted in the best interest of their children. This is because this fraction not only views ethnic diversity as a threat but also as an asset to the development of their offspring. Indeed, the interest of these parents in their children acquiring ‘multicultural competences’ converged with integration efforts. As this fraction’s choice for diversity is mainly driven by self-interest (and thus not so much by a social justice ethic), we assert that one should be wary with assuming beneficial effects of such an integration for the minoritized student body.
Keywords
School Choice, social mix, ethnic mix, gentrification

Downloads

  • The Good Samaritans.docx
    • full text
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • Word
    • |
    • 77.14 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Goossens, Cedric, and Angelo Van Gorp. “The Good Samaritans? A Critical Race Analysis of White Middle-class Families’ Choice for Ethnically Diverse Schools.” 2016. Print.
APA
Goossens, Cedric, & Van Gorp, A. (2016). The Good Samaritans? A critical race analysis of white middle-class families’ choice for ethnically diverse schools. Presented at the ASA 111th Annual Meeting: Rethinking Social Movements: Can Changing the Conversation Change the World?
Chicago author-date
Goossens, Cedric, and Angelo Van Gorp. 2016. “The Good Samaritans? A Critical Race Analysis of White Middle-class Families’ Choice for Ethnically Diverse Schools.” In .
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Goossens, Cedric, and Angelo Van Gorp. 2016. “The Good Samaritans? A Critical Race Analysis of White Middle-class Families’ Choice for Ethnically Diverse Schools.” In .
Vancouver
1.
Goossens C, Van Gorp A. The Good Samaritans? A critical race analysis of white middle-class families’ choice for ethnically diverse schools. 2016.
IEEE
[1]
C. Goossens and A. Van Gorp, “The Good Samaritans? A critical race analysis of white middle-class families’ choice for ethnically diverse schools,” presented at the ASA 111th Annual Meeting: Rethinking Social Movements: Can Changing the Conversation Change the World?, Seattle, 2016.
@inproceedings{8541913,
  abstract     = {Traditionally, literature on school choice has asserted that most white middle-class fractions avoid ethnically diverse schools, as they are believed to hinder cognitive, personal and social development. Nonetheless some families value against the grain, and apply for ethnically diverse schools. The present contribution focuses on this intriguing phenomenon by examining the motives underlying these parents’ choice for diversity. In order to do this, we focus on a group of white middle-class gentrifiers in the context of Ghent (Belgium) of whom the children are enrolled in an ethnically diverse public school. Making an appeal to critical race theory, we suggest that the prevailing assumption, namely that these parents are disinterested selfless subjects who are solely putting their values into action, needs to be revisited. In fact, rather than driven by a framework of personal values, our analyses suggests that these parents mainly acted in the best interest of their children. This is because this fraction not only views ethnic diversity as a threat but also as an asset to the development of their offspring. Indeed, the interest of these parents in their children acquiring ‘multicultural competences’ converged with integration efforts. As this fraction’s choice for diversity is mainly driven by self-interest (and thus not so much by a social justice ethic), we assert that one should be wary with assuming beneficial effects of such an integration for the minoritized student body.},
  author       = {Goossens, Cedric and Van Gorp, Angelo},
  keywords     = {School Choice,social mix,ethnic mix,gentrification},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Seattle},
  title        = {The Good Samaritans? A critical race analysis of white middle-class families’ choice for ethnically diverse schools},
  url          = {https://convention2.allacademic.com/one/asa/asa16/},
  year         = {2016},
}