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Mental health nurses and mental health peer workers : self-perceptions of role-related clinical competences

Bart Debyser (UGent) , Veerle Duprez (UGent) , Dimitri Beeckman (UGent) , Joeri Vandewalle (UGent) , Ann Van Hecke (UGent) , Eddy Deproost (UGent) and Sofie Verhaeghe (UGent)
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Abstract
In a mental healthcare that embraces a recovery-oriented practice, the employment of mental health peer workers is encouraged. Although peer workers are increasingly working together with nurses, there is a lack of research that explores how nurses and peer workers perceive their role-related competences in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to clarify and understand these self-perceptions in order to identify the specificity and potential complementarity of both roles. This insight is needed to underpin a successful partnership between both vocations. A qualitative descriptive research design based on principles of critical incident methodology was used. Twelve nurses and eight peer workers from different mental healthcare organizations participated. A total of 132 reported cases were analysed. Rigour was achieved through thick description, audit trail, investigator triangulation and peer review. Nurses relate their role-related competences predominantly with being compliant with instructions, being a team player and ensuring security and control. Peer workers relate their role-related competences with being able to maintain themselves as a peer worker, building up a relationship that is supportive for both the patient and themselves, and to utilize their lived experience. Both nurses and peer workers assign a major role to the team in determining their satisfaction with their competences. Consequently, what is perceived as important for the team appears to overshadow their self-assessment of competences. The findings highlighted the importance of paying more attention to identity construction, empowerment and role competence development of nurses and peer workers in their respective education and ongoing training.
Keywords
clinical competence, critical incident, nursing, peer worker, qualitative research, CRITICAL INCIDENT TECHNIQUE, SERVICES, IMPLEMENTATION, METASYNTHESIS, SPECIALISTS, CHALLENGES, RECOVERY, SUPPORT, CARE

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Chicago
Debyser, Bart, Veerle Duprez, Dimitri Beeckman, Joeri Vandewalle, Ann Van Hecke, Eddy Deproost, and Sofie Verhaeghe. 2018. “Mental Health Nurses and Mental Health Peer Workers : Self-perceptions of Role-related Clinical Competences.” International Journal of Mental Health Nursing 27 (3): 987–1001.
APA
Debyser, B., Duprez, V., Beeckman, D., Vandewalle, J., Van Hecke, A., Deproost, E., & Verhaeghe, S. (2018). Mental health nurses and mental health peer workers : self-perceptions of role-related clinical competences. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 27(3), 987–1001.
Vancouver
1.
Debyser B, Duprez V, Beeckman D, Vandewalle J, Van Hecke A, Deproost E, et al. Mental health nurses and mental health peer workers : self-perceptions of role-related clinical competences. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING. 2018;27(3):987–1001.
MLA
Debyser, Bart, Veerle Duprez, Dimitri Beeckman, et al. “Mental Health Nurses and Mental Health Peer Workers : Self-perceptions of Role-related Clinical Competences.” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING 27.3 (2018): 987–1001. Print.
@article{8541303,
  abstract     = {In a mental healthcare that embraces a recovery-oriented practice, the employment of mental health peer workers is encouraged. Although peer workers are increasingly working together with nurses, there is a lack of research that explores how nurses and peer workers perceive their role-related competences in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to clarify and understand these self-perceptions in order to identify the specificity and potential complementarity of both roles. This insight is needed to underpin a successful partnership between both vocations. A qualitative descriptive research design based on principles of critical incident methodology was used. Twelve nurses and eight peer workers from different mental healthcare organizations participated. A total of 132 reported cases were analysed. Rigour was achieved through thick description, audit trail, investigator triangulation and peer review. Nurses relate their role-related competences predominantly with being compliant with instructions, being a team player and ensuring security and control. Peer workers relate their role-related competences with being able to maintain themselves as a peer worker, building up a relationship that is supportive for both the patient and themselves, and to utilize their lived experience. Both nurses and peer workers assign a major role to the team in determining their satisfaction with their competences. Consequently, what is perceived as important for the team appears to overshadow their self-assessment of competences. The findings highlighted the importance of paying more attention to identity construction, empowerment and role competence development of nurses and peer workers in their respective education and ongoing training.},
  author       = {Debyser, Bart and Duprez, Veerle and Beeckman, Dimitri and Vandewalle, Joeri and Van Hecke, Ann and Deproost, Eddy and Verhaeghe, Sofie},
  issn         = {1445-8330},
  journal      = {INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {987--1001},
  title        = {Mental health nurses and mental health peer workers : self-perceptions of role-related clinical competences},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/inm.12406},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2018},
}

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