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How serially organized working memory information interacts with timing

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Abstract
The temporary storage of serial order informa- tion in working memory (WM) has been demonstrated to be crucial to higher order cognition. The previous studies have shown that the maintenance of serial order can be a consequence of the construction of position markers to which to-be-remembered information will be bound. However, the nature of these position markers remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrate the crucial involvement of time in the construction of these markers by establishing a bidirectional relationship. First, results of the first experiment show that the initial items in WM result in faster responding after shorter time presentations, while we observe the opposite for items stored further in WM. Second, in the next experiment, we observe an effect of temporal cueing on WM retrieval; longer time cues facil- itate responding to later WM items compared with items stored at the beginning of WM. These findings are dis- cussed in the context of position marker theories, reviewing the functional involvement of time in the construction of these markers and its association with space.
Keywords
serial order, working memory, time

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
De Belder, Maya, Jean-Philippe van Dijck, Marinella Cappelletti, and Wim Fias. 2017. “How Serially Organized Working Memory Information Interacts with Timing.” Psychological Research-psychologische Forschung 81 (6): 1255–1263.
APA
De Belder, M., van Dijck, J.-P., Cappelletti, M., & Fias, W. (2017). How serially organized working memory information interacts with timing. PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH-PSYCHOLOGISCHE FORSCHUNG, 81(6), 1255–1263.
Vancouver
1.
De Belder M, van Dijck J-P, Cappelletti M, Fias W. How serially organized working memory information interacts with timing. PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH-PSYCHOLOGISCHE FORSCHUNG. Springer Nature; 2017;81(6):1255–63.
MLA
De Belder, Maya, Jean-Philippe van Dijck, Marinella Cappelletti, et al. “How Serially Organized Working Memory Information Interacts with Timing.” PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH-PSYCHOLOGISCHE FORSCHUNG 81.6 (2017): 1255–1263. Print.
@article{8541034,
  abstract     = {The temporary storage of serial order informa- tion in working memory (WM) has been demonstrated to be crucial to higher order cognition. The previous studies have shown that the maintenance of serial order can be a consequence of the construction of position markers to which to-be-remembered information will be bound. However, the nature of these position markers remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrate the crucial involvement of time in the construction of these markers by establishing a bidirectional relationship. First, results of the first experiment show that the initial items in WM result in faster responding after shorter time presentations, while we observe the opposite for items stored further in WM. Second, in the next experiment, we observe an effect of temporal cueing on WM retrieval; longer time cues facil- itate responding to later WM items compared with items stored at the beginning of WM. These findings are dis- cussed in the context of position marker theories, reviewing the functional involvement of time in the construction of these markers and its association with space.
},
  author       = {De Belder, Maya and van Dijck, Jean-Philippe and Cappelletti, Marinella and Fias, Wim},
  issn         = {1430-2772},
  journal      = {PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH-PSYCHOLOGISCHE FORSCHUNG},
  keyword      = {serial order,working memory,time},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1255--1263},
  publisher    = {Springer Nature},
  title        = {How serially organized working memory information interacts with timing},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00426-016-0816-8},
  volume       = {81},
  year         = {2017},
}

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