Advanced search
1 file | 4.43 MB

The development syndrome : post-war housing and residential segregation in French Dakar (Senegal) : building and contesting the SICAP housing schemes in the late colonial period (1951-1960)

Luce Beeckmans (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
After WWII European welfare planning was transposed to the African colonies. With regard to housing this meant a true turning point in urban policy. Under a development slogan, colonial powers for the first time massively invested in the housing of African urban dwellers. This was especially the case in French Dakar, Senegal, where the Société Immobilière du Cap Vert (SICAP) was one of the most productive housing institutions in post-war sub-Saharan Africa. This article however argues that the development discourse mobilised by the colonial government not only formed the basis to modernize the city. It also served as an instrument to legitimise a new kind of residential segregation, a phenomenon I called the 'Developed Syndrome'. Yet Africans were no passive victims of development schemes. This article brings to the fore various forms of agency that were evoked by the ambiguous motivations underscoring the SICAP housing and resettlement schemes.
Keywords
residential segregation, colonial housing, development, SICAP, Dakar

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 4.43 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Beeckmans, Luce. 2017. “The Development Syndrome : Post-war Housing and Residential Segregation in French Dakar (Senegal) : Building and Contesting the SICAP Housing Schemes in the Late Colonial Period (1951-1960).” Canadian Journal of African Studies 51 (3): 359–388.
APA
Beeckmans, Luce. (2017). The development syndrome : post-war housing and residential segregation in French Dakar (Senegal) : building and contesting the SICAP housing schemes in the late colonial period (1951-1960). CANADIAN JOURNAL OF AFRICAN STUDIES, 51(3), 359–388.
Vancouver
1.
Beeckmans L. The development syndrome : post-war housing and residential segregation in French Dakar (Senegal) : building and contesting the SICAP housing schemes in the late colonial period (1951-1960). CANADIAN JOURNAL OF AFRICAN STUDIES. 2017;51(3):359–88.
MLA
Beeckmans, Luce. “The Development Syndrome : Post-war Housing and Residential Segregation in French Dakar (Senegal) : Building and Contesting the SICAP Housing Schemes in the Late Colonial Period (1951-1960).” CANADIAN JOURNAL OF AFRICAN STUDIES 51.3 (2017): 359–388. Print.
@article{8538905,
  abstract     = {After WWII European welfare planning was transposed to the African colonies. With regard to housing this meant a true turning point in urban policy. Under a development slogan, colonial powers for the first time massively invested in the housing of African urban dwellers. This was especially the case in French Dakar, Senegal, where the Société Immobilière du Cap Vert (SICAP) was one of the most productive housing institutions in post-war sub-Saharan Africa. This article however argues that the development discourse mobilised by the colonial government not only formed the basis to modernize the city. It also served as an instrument to legitimise a new kind of residential segregation, a phenomenon I called the 'Developed Syndrome'. Yet Africans were no passive victims of development schemes. This article brings to the fore various forms of agency that were evoked by the ambiguous motivations underscoring the SICAP housing and resettlement schemes.
},
  author       = {Beeckmans, Luce},
  issn         = {0008-3968},
  journal      = {CANADIAN JOURNAL OF AFRICAN STUDIES},
  keywords     = {residential segregation,colonial housing,development,SICAP,Dakar},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {359--388},
  title        = {The development syndrome : post-war housing and residential segregation in French Dakar (Senegal) : building and contesting the SICAP housing schemes in the late colonial period (1951-1960)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00083968.2017.1411820},
  volume       = {51},
  year         = {2017},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric