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Comparative phylogeography of a vulnerable bat and its ectoparasite reveals dispersal of a non-mobile parasite among distinct evolutionarily significant units of the host

(2018) CONSERVATION GENETICS. 19(2). p.481-494
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Abstract
Knowledge about phylogeographical structuring and genetic diversity is of key importance for the conservation of endangered species. Comparative phylogeography of a host and its parasite has the potential to reveal cryptic dispersal and behaviour in both species, and can thus be used to guide conservation management. In this study, we investigate the phylogeographic structure of the Bechstein’s bat, Myotis bechsteinii, and its ectoparasitic bat fly, Basilia nana, at 12 sites across their entire distribution. For both species, a mitochondrial sequence fragment (ND1 and COI respectively) and nuclear microsatellite genotypes (14 and 10 loci respectively) were generated and used to compare the phylogeography of host and parasite. Our findings confirm the presence of three distinct genetic subpopulations of the Bechstein’s bat in (1) Europe, (2) the Caucasus and (3) Iran, which remain isolated from one another. The genetic distinctiveness of host populations in the Caucasus region and Iran emphasize that these populations must be managed as distinct evolutionarily significant units. This phylogeographical pattern is however not reflected in its parasite, B. nana, which shows evidence for more recent dispersal between host subpopulations. The discordant genetic pattern between host and parasite suggest that despite the long-term genetic isolation of the different host subpopulations, long-range dispersal of the parasite has occurred more recently, either as the result of secondary contact in the primary host or via secondary host species. This indicates that a novel pathogenic threat to one host subpopulation may be able to disperse, and thus have important consequences for all subpopulations.
Keywords
Myotis bechsteinii, Basilia nana, Nycteribiidae, Co-phylogeography, Parasite biogeography, BECHSTEINS BATS, MYOTIS-BECHSTEINII, GENETIC-STRUCTURE, SWARMING SITES, POPULATION-STRUCTURE, RE-IMPLEMENTATION, NYCTALUS-NOCTULA, MITOCHONDRIAL, SOFTWARE, HISTORY

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Citation

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MLA
van Schaik, Jaap et al. “Comparative Phylogeography of a Vulnerable Bat and Its Ectoparasite Reveals Dispersal of a Non-mobile Parasite Among Distinct Evolutionarily Significant Units of the Host.” CONSERVATION GENETICS 19.2 (2018): 481–494. Print.
APA
van Schaik, J., Dekeukeleire, D., Gazaryan, S., Natradze, I., & Kerth, G. (2018). Comparative phylogeography of a vulnerable bat and its ectoparasite reveals dispersal of a non-mobile parasite among distinct evolutionarily significant units of the host. CONSERVATION GENETICS, 19(2), 481–494.
Chicago author-date
van Schaik, Jaap, Daan Dekeukeleire, Suren Gazaryan, Ioseb Natradze, and Gerald Kerth. 2018. “Comparative Phylogeography of a Vulnerable Bat and Its Ectoparasite Reveals Dispersal of a Non-mobile Parasite Among Distinct Evolutionarily Significant Units of the Host.” Conservation Genetics 19 (2): 481–494.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
van Schaik, Jaap, Daan Dekeukeleire, Suren Gazaryan, Ioseb Natradze, and Gerald Kerth. 2018. “Comparative Phylogeography of a Vulnerable Bat and Its Ectoparasite Reveals Dispersal of a Non-mobile Parasite Among Distinct Evolutionarily Significant Units of the Host.” Conservation Genetics 19 (2): 481–494.
Vancouver
1.
van Schaik J, Dekeukeleire D, Gazaryan S, Natradze I, Kerth G. Comparative phylogeography of a vulnerable bat and its ectoparasite reveals dispersal of a non-mobile parasite among distinct evolutionarily significant units of the host. CONSERVATION GENETICS. 2018;19(2):481–94.
IEEE
[1]
J. van Schaik, D. Dekeukeleire, S. Gazaryan, I. Natradze, and G. Kerth, “Comparative phylogeography of a vulnerable bat and its ectoparasite reveals dispersal of a non-mobile parasite among distinct evolutionarily significant units of the host,” CONSERVATION GENETICS, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 481–494, 2018.
@article{8535867,
  abstract     = {Knowledge about phylogeographical structuring and genetic diversity is of key importance for the conservation of endangered species. Comparative phylogeography of a host and its parasite has the potential to reveal cryptic dispersal and behaviour in both species, and can thus be used to guide conservation management. In this study, we investigate the phylogeographic structure of the Bechstein’s bat, Myotis bechsteinii, and its ectoparasitic bat fly, Basilia nana, at 12 sites across their entire distribution. For both species, a mitochondrial sequence fragment (ND1 and COI respectively) and nuclear microsatellite genotypes (14 and 10 loci respectively) were generated and used to compare the phylogeography of host and parasite. Our findings confirm the presence of three distinct genetic subpopulations of the Bechstein’s bat in (1) Europe, (2) the Caucasus and (3) Iran, which remain isolated from one another. The genetic distinctiveness of host populations in the Caucasus region and Iran emphasize that these populations must be managed as distinct evolutionarily significant units. This phylogeographical pattern is however not reflected in its parasite, B. nana, which shows evidence for more recent dispersal between host subpopulations. The discordant genetic pattern between host and parasite suggest that despite the long-term genetic isolation of the different host subpopulations, long-range dispersal of the parasite has occurred more recently, either as the result of secondary contact in the primary host or via secondary host species. This indicates that a novel pathogenic threat to one host subpopulation may be able to disperse, and thus have important consequences for all subpopulations.},
  author       = {van Schaik, Jaap and Dekeukeleire, Daan and Gazaryan, Suren and Natradze, Ioseb and Kerth, Gerald},
  issn         = {1566-0621},
  journal      = {CONSERVATION GENETICS},
  keywords     = {Myotis bechsteinii,Basilia nana,Nycteribiidae,Co-phylogeography,Parasite biogeography,BECHSTEINS BATS,MYOTIS-BECHSTEINII,GENETIC-STRUCTURE,SWARMING SITES,POPULATION-STRUCTURE,RE-IMPLEMENTATION,NYCTALUS-NOCTULA,MITOCHONDRIAL,SOFTWARE,HISTORY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {481--494},
  title        = {Comparative phylogeography of a vulnerable bat and its ectoparasite reveals dispersal of a non-mobile parasite among distinct evolutionarily significant units of the host},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10592-017-1024-9},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2018},
}

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