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Surface electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius before and after a single dry needling session in female office workers with trapezius myalgia

Kayleigh De Meulemeester UGent, Patrick Calders UGent, Vincent Dewitte UGent, Tom Barbe UGent, Lieven Danneels UGent and Barbara Cagnie UGent (2017) AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE & REHABILITATION. 96(12). p.861-868
abstract
Objective: Myofascial pain can be accompanied by a disturbed surface electromyographic (sEMG) activity. Nevertheless, the effect of myofascial treatment techniques, such as dry needling (DN), on the sEMG activity is poorly investigated. Several DN studies also emphasize the importance of eliciting local twitch responses (LTRs) during treatment. However, studies investigating the added value of LTRs are scarce. Therefore, the aims of this study were first to evaluate the effect of DN on the sEMG activity of myalgic muscle tissue, compared with no intervention (rest), and secondly to identify whether this effect is dependent of eliciting LTRs during DN. Methods: Twenty-four female office workers with work-related trapezius myalgia were included. After completion of a typing task, changes in sEMG activity were evaluated after a DN treatment of the upper trapezius, compared with rest. Results: The sEMG activity increased after rest and after DN, but this increase was significantly smaller 10 minutes after DN, compared with rest. These differences were independent whether LTRs were elicited or not. Conclusions: Dry needling leads to a significantly lower increase in sEMG activity of the upper trapezius, compared with no intervention, after a typing task. This difference was independent of eliciting LTRs.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Myofascial Pain Syndromes, Trigger Points, Superficial Back Muscles, Neck Pain, MYOFASCIAL TRIGGER POINTS, MUSCLE ACTIVATION PATTERNS, PAIN SYNDROME, NECK PAIN, LIDOCAINE INJECTION, HEALTHY-SUBJECTS, BLOOD-FLOW, FATIGUE, NORMALIZATION, STIMULATION
journal title
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE & REHABILITATION
Am. J. Phys. Med. Rehabil.
volume
96
issue
12
pages
861 - 868
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000415752600010
ISSN
0894-9115
DOI
10.1097/phm.0000000000000761
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
U
copyright statement
I don't know the status of the copyright for this publication
id
8535377
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8535377
date created
2017-10-24 10:28:17
date last changed
2018-05-17 06:38:59
@article{8535377,
  abstract     = {Objective: Myofascial pain can be accompanied by a disturbed surface electromyographic (sEMG) activity. Nevertheless, the effect of myofascial treatment techniques, such as dry needling (DN), on the sEMG activity is poorly investigated. Several DN studies also emphasize the importance of eliciting local twitch responses (LTRs) during treatment. However, studies investigating the added value of LTRs are scarce. Therefore, the aims of this study were first to evaluate the effect of DN on the sEMG activity of myalgic muscle tissue, compared with no intervention (rest), and secondly to identify whether this effect is dependent of eliciting LTRs during DN. 
Methods: Twenty-four female office workers with work-related trapezius myalgia were included. After completion of a typing task, changes in sEMG activity were evaluated after a DN treatment of the upper trapezius, compared with rest. 
Results: The sEMG activity increased after rest and after DN, but this increase was significantly smaller 10 minutes after DN, compared with rest. These differences were independent whether LTRs were elicited or not. 
Conclusions: Dry needling leads to a significantly lower increase in sEMG activity of the upper trapezius, compared with no intervention, after a typing task. This difference was independent of eliciting LTRs.},
  author       = {De Meulemeester, Kayleigh and Calders, Patrick and Dewitte, Vincent and Barbe, Tom and Danneels, Lieven and Cagnie, Barbara},
  issn         = {0894-9115},
  journal      = {AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE \& REHABILITATION},
  keyword      = {Myofascial Pain Syndromes,Trigger Points,Superficial Back Muscles,Neck Pain,MYOFASCIAL TRIGGER POINTS,MUSCLE ACTIVATION PATTERNS,PAIN SYNDROME,NECK PAIN,LIDOCAINE INJECTION,HEALTHY-SUBJECTS,BLOOD-FLOW,FATIGUE,NORMALIZATION,STIMULATION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {861--868},
  title        = {Surface electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius before and after a single dry needling session in female office workers with trapezius myalgia},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/phm.0000000000000761},
  volume       = {96},
  year         = {2017},
}

Chicago
De Meulemeester, Kayleigh, Patrick Calders, Vincent Dewitte, Tom Barbe, Lieven Danneels, and Barbara Cagnie. 2017. “Surface Electromyographic Activity of the Upper Trapezius Before and After a Single Dry Needling Session in Female Office Workers with Trapezius Myalgia.” American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation 96 (12): 861–868.
APA
De Meulemeester, K., Calders, P., Dewitte, V., Barbe, T., Danneels, L., & Cagnie, B. (2017). Surface electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius before and after a single dry needling session in female office workers with trapezius myalgia. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE & REHABILITATION, 96(12), 861–868.
Vancouver
1.
De Meulemeester K, Calders P, Dewitte V, Barbe T, Danneels L, Cagnie B. Surface electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius before and after a single dry needling session in female office workers with trapezius myalgia. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE & REHABILITATION. 2017;96(12):861–8.
MLA
De Meulemeester, Kayleigh, Patrick Calders, Vincent Dewitte, et al. “Surface Electromyographic Activity of the Upper Trapezius Before and After a Single Dry Needling Session in Female Office Workers with Trapezius Myalgia.” AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE & REHABILITATION 96.12 (2017): 861–868. Print.