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Are the effects of response inhibition on gambling long-lasting?

(2013) PLOS ONE. 8(7).
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Abstract
A recent study has shown that short-term training in response inhibition can make people more cautious for up to two hours when making decisions. However, the longevity of such training effects is unclear. In this study we tested whether training in the stop-signal paradigm reduces risky gambling when the training and gambling task are separated by 24 hours. Two independent experiments revealed that the aftereffects of stop-signal training are negligible after 24 hours. This was supported by Bayes factors that provided strong support for the null hypothesis. These findings indicate the need to better optimise the parameters of inhibition training to achieve clinical efficacy, potentially by strengthening automatic associations between specific stimuli and stopping.
Keywords
INFERIOR FRONTAL-CORTEX, SUBSTANCE USE DISORDERS, STOP-SIGNAL PARADIGM, PREFRONTAL CORTEX, DECISION-MAKING, SELF-CONTROL, RISK-TAKING, DRUG-USE, IMPULSIVITY, MODEL

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Verbruggen, Frederick et al. “Are the Effects of Response Inhibition on Gambling Long-lasting?” PLOS ONE 8.7 (2013): n. pag. Print.
APA
Verbruggen, Frederick, Adams, R. C., van  ’t Wout, F., Stevens, T., McLaren, I. P. L., & Chambers, C. D. (2013). Are the effects of response inhibition on gambling long-lasting? PLOS ONE, 8(7).
Chicago author-date
Verbruggen, Frederick, Rachel C. Adams, Felice van  ’t Wout, Tobias Stevens, Ian P. L. McLaren, and Christopher D. Chambers. 2013. “Are the Effects of Response Inhibition on Gambling Long-lasting?” Plos One 8 (7).
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Verbruggen, Frederick, Rachel C. Adams, Felice van  ’t Wout, Tobias Stevens, Ian P. L. McLaren, and Christopher D. Chambers. 2013. “Are the Effects of Response Inhibition on Gambling Long-lasting?” Plos One 8 (7).
Vancouver
1.
Verbruggen F, Adams RC, van  ’t Wout F, Stevens T, McLaren IPL, Chambers CD. Are the effects of response inhibition on gambling long-lasting? PLOS ONE. San francisco: Public Library Science; 2013;8(7).
IEEE
[1]
F. Verbruggen, R. C. Adams, F. van ’t Wout, T. Stevens, I. P. L. McLaren, and C. D. Chambers, “Are the effects of response inhibition on gambling long-lasting?,” PLOS ONE, vol. 8, no. 7, 2013.
@article{8534955,
  abstract     = {A recent study has shown that short-term training in response inhibition can make people more cautious for up to two hours when making decisions. However, the longevity of such training effects is unclear. In this study we tested whether training in the stop-signal paradigm reduces risky gambling when the training and gambling task are separated by 24 hours. Two independent experiments revealed that the aftereffects of stop-signal training are negligible after 24 hours. This was supported by Bayes factors that provided strong support for the null hypothesis. These findings indicate the need to better optimise the parameters of inhibition training to achieve clinical efficacy, potentially by strengthening automatic associations between specific stimuli and stopping.},
  articleno    = {e70155},
  author       = {Verbruggen, Frederick and Adams, Rachel C. and van 't Wout, Felice and Stevens, Tobias and McLaren, Ian P. L. and Chambers, Christopher D.},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  journal      = {PLOS ONE},
  keywords     = {INFERIOR FRONTAL-CORTEX,SUBSTANCE USE DISORDERS,STOP-SIGNAL PARADIGM,PREFRONTAL CORTEX,DECISION-MAKING,SELF-CONTROL,RISK-TAKING,DRUG-USE,IMPULSIVITY,MODEL},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {7},
  publisher    = {Public Library Science},
  title        = {Are the effects of response inhibition on gambling long-lasting?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0070155},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2013},
}

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