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Reorienting the mind : the impact of novel sounds on Go/No-Go performance

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Abstract
The present study explores the link between attentional reorienting and response inhibition. Recent behavioral and neuroscience work indicates that both might rely on similar cognitive and neural mechanisms. We tested 2 popular accounts of the overlap: The "circuit breaker" account, which assumes that unexpected events produce global suppression of motor output, and the "stimulus detection" account, which assumes that attention is reoriented to unexpected events. In Experiment 1, we presented standard and (unexpected) novel sounds in a go/no-go task. Consistent with the stimulus detection account, we found longer reaction times on go trials and higher rates of commission errors on no-go trials when these were preceded by a novel sound compared with a standard sound. In Experiment 2, novel and standard sounds acted as no-go signals. In this experiment, the novel sounds produced an improvement on no-go trials. This further highlights the importance of stimulus detection for response inhibition. Combined, the 2 experiments support the idea that attention is oriented to novel or unexpected events, impairing no-go performance if these events are irrelevant but enhancing no-go performance when they are relevant. Our findings also indicate that the popular circuit breaker account of the overlap between response inhibition and attentional reorienting needs some revision.
Keywords
VISUAL-ATTENTION, INVOLUNTARY ATTENTION, INHIBITORY CONTROL, NEURAL, MECHANISMS, ACOUSTIC NOVELTY, FRONTAL-CORTEX, BASAL GANGLIA, HUMAN, BRAIN, MODEL, TASK, attention reorienting, response inhibition, cross-modal oddball, go/no-go, circuit breaker

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MLA
Leiva, Alicia et al. “Reorienting the Mind : the Impact of Novel Sounds on Go/No-Go Performance.” JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-HUMAN PERCEPTION AND PERFORMANCE 41.5 (2015): 1197–1202. Print.
APA
Leiva, A., Parmentier, F. B. R., Elchlepp, H., & Verbruggen, F. (2015). Reorienting the mind : the impact of novel sounds on Go/No-Go performance. JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-HUMAN PERCEPTION AND PERFORMANCE, 41(5), 1197–1202.
Chicago author-date
Leiva, Alicia, Fabrice B. R. Parmentier, Heike Elchlepp, and Frederick Verbruggen. 2015. “Reorienting the Mind : the Impact of Novel Sounds on Go/No-Go Performance.” Journal of Experimental Psychology-human Perception and Performance 41 (5): 1197–1202.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Leiva, Alicia, Fabrice B. R. Parmentier, Heike Elchlepp, and Frederick Verbruggen. 2015. “Reorienting the Mind : the Impact of Novel Sounds on Go/No-Go Performance.” Journal of Experimental Psychology-human Perception and Performance 41 (5): 1197–1202.
Vancouver
1.
Leiva A, Parmentier FBR, Elchlepp H, Verbruggen F. Reorienting the mind : the impact of novel sounds on Go/No-Go performance. JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-HUMAN PERCEPTION AND PERFORMANCE. Washington: Amer Psychological Assoc; 2015;41(5):1197–202.
IEEE
[1]
A. Leiva, F. B. R. Parmentier, H. Elchlepp, and F. Verbruggen, “Reorienting the mind : the impact of novel sounds on Go/No-Go performance,” JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-HUMAN PERCEPTION AND PERFORMANCE, vol. 41, no. 5, pp. 1197–1202, 2015.
@article{8534932,
  abstract     = {The present study explores the link between attentional reorienting and response inhibition. Recent behavioral and neuroscience work indicates that both might rely on similar cognitive and neural mechanisms. We tested 2 popular accounts of the overlap: The "circuit breaker" account, which assumes that unexpected events produce global suppression of motor output, and the "stimulus detection" account, which assumes that attention is reoriented to unexpected events. In Experiment 1, we presented standard and (unexpected) novel sounds in a go/no-go task. Consistent with the stimulus detection account, we found longer reaction times on go trials and higher rates of commission errors on no-go trials when these were preceded by a novel sound compared with a standard sound. In Experiment 2, novel and standard sounds acted as no-go signals. In this experiment, the novel sounds produced an improvement on no-go trials. This further highlights the importance of stimulus detection for response inhibition. Combined, the 2 experiments support the idea that attention is oriented to novel or unexpected events, impairing no-go performance if these events are irrelevant but enhancing no-go performance when they are relevant. Our findings also indicate that the popular circuit breaker account of the overlap between response inhibition and attentional reorienting needs some revision.},
  author       = {Leiva, Alicia and Parmentier, Fabrice B. R. and Elchlepp, Heike and Verbruggen, Frederick},
  issn         = {0096-1523},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-HUMAN PERCEPTION AND PERFORMANCE},
  keywords     = {VISUAL-ATTENTION,INVOLUNTARY ATTENTION,INHIBITORY CONTROL,NEURAL,MECHANISMS,ACOUSTIC NOVELTY,FRONTAL-CORTEX,BASAL GANGLIA,HUMAN,BRAIN,MODEL,TASK,attention reorienting,response inhibition,cross-modal oddball,go/no-go,circuit breaker},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1197--1202},
  publisher    = {Amer Psychological Assoc},
  title        = {Reorienting the mind : the impact of novel sounds on Go/No-Go performance},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/xhp0000111},
  volume       = {41},
  year         = {2015},
}

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