Advanced search
1 file | 2.08 MB

Proactive inhibitory control : a general biasing account

(2016) COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY. 86. p.27-61
Author
Organization
Abstract
Flexible behavior requires a control system that can inhibit actions in response to changes in the environment. Recent studies suggest that people proactively adjust response parameters in anticipation of a stop signal. In three experiments, we tested the hypothesis that proactive inhibitory control involves adjusting both attentional and response settings, and we explored the relationship with other forms of proactive and anticipatory control. Subjects responded to the color of a stimulus. On some trials, an extra signal occurred. The response to this signal depended on the task context subjects were in: in the 'ignore' context, they ignored it; in the 'stop' context, they had to withhold their response; and in the 'double-response' context, they had to execute a secondary response. An analysis of event-related brain potentials for no signal trials in the stop context revealed that proactive inhibitory control works by biasing the settings of lower-level systems that are involved in stimulus detection, action selection, and action execution. Furthermore, subjects made similar adjustments in the double-response and stop-signal contexts, indicating an overlap between various forms of proactive action control. The results of Experiment 1 also suggest an overlap between proactive inhibitory control and preparatory control in task-switching studies: both require reconfiguration of task-set parameters to bias or alter subordinate processes. We conclude that much of the top-down control in response inhibition tasks takes place before the inhibition signal is presented. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.
Keywords
EVENT-RELATED POTENTIALS, TRIGGERED RESPONSE-INHIBITION, SELECTIVE, VISUAL-ATTENTION, TASK-SET RECONFIGURATION, STOP-SIGNAL PARADIGM, COGNITIVE CONTROL, NEURAL MECHANISMS, FRONTAL-CORTEX, RACE MODEL, BRAIN, Proactive control, Response inhibition, Dual-task performance, Biased, competition, EEG

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 2.08 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Elchlepp, Heike, Aureliu Lavric, Christopher D. Chambers, and Frederick Verbruggen. 2016. “Proactive Inhibitory Control : a General Biasing Account.” Cognitive Psychology 86: 27–61.
APA
Elchlepp, Heike, Lavric, A., Chambers, C. D., & Verbruggen, F. (2016). Proactive inhibitory control : a general biasing account. COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY, 86, 27–61.
Vancouver
1.
Elchlepp H, Lavric A, Chambers CD, Verbruggen F. Proactive inhibitory control : a general biasing account. COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY. San diego: Academic Press Inc Elsevier Science; 2016;86:27–61.
MLA
Elchlepp, Heike et al. “Proactive Inhibitory Control : a General Biasing Account.” COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY 86 (2016): 27–61. Print.
@article{8534928,
  abstract     = {Flexible behavior requires a control system that can inhibit actions in response to changes in the environment. Recent studies suggest that people proactively adjust response parameters in anticipation of a stop signal. In three experiments, we tested the hypothesis that proactive inhibitory control involves adjusting both attentional and response settings, and we explored the relationship with other forms of proactive and anticipatory control. Subjects responded to the color of a stimulus. On some trials, an extra signal occurred. The response to this signal depended on the task context subjects were in: in the 'ignore' context, they ignored it; in the 'stop' context, they had to withhold their response; and in the 'double-response' context, they had to execute a secondary response. An analysis of event-related brain potentials for no signal trials in the stop context revealed that proactive inhibitory control works by biasing the settings of lower-level systems that are involved in stimulus detection, action selection, and action execution. Furthermore, subjects made similar adjustments in the double-response and stop-signal contexts, indicating an overlap between various forms of proactive action control. The results of Experiment 1 also suggest an overlap between proactive inhibitory control and preparatory control in task-switching studies: both require reconfiguration of task-set parameters to bias or alter subordinate processes. We conclude that much of the top-down control in response inhibition tasks takes place before the inhibition signal is presented. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.},
  author       = {Elchlepp, Heike and Lavric, Aureliu and Chambers, Christopher D. and Verbruggen, Frederick},
  issn         = {0010-0285},
  journal      = {COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY},
  keywords     = {EVENT-RELATED POTENTIALS,TRIGGERED RESPONSE-INHIBITION,SELECTIVE,VISUAL-ATTENTION,TASK-SET RECONFIGURATION,STOP-SIGNAL PARADIGM,COGNITIVE CONTROL,NEURAL MECHANISMS,FRONTAL-CORTEX,RACE MODEL,BRAIN,Proactive control,Response inhibition,Dual-task performance,Biased,competition,EEG},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {27--61},
  publisher    = {Academic Press Inc Elsevier Science},
  title        = {Proactive inhibitory control : a general biasing account},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogpsych.2016.01.004},
  volume       = {86},
  year         = {2016},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: