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Memory Studies and the Anthropocene: A Roundtable

Stef Craps UGent, Rick Crownshaw, Jennifer Wenzel, Rosanne Kennedy, Claire Colebrook and Vin Nardizzi (2018) MEMORY STUDIES. 11(4).
abstract
The essays gathered here are slightly revised versions of the position papers presented as part of the roundtable on “Memory Studies and the Anthropocene” at the MLA Convention in Philadelphia in January 2017. What sparked this roundtable is the increasing currency of the Anthropocene, on the one hand, and the observation that the field of memory studies has lately begun to grapple with its implications in earnest, on the other. The participants, all of them leading scholars in the fields of memory studies and/or the environmental humanities, had been asked to respond to the following questions: “What are the implications of the notion of the Anthropocene for memory studies? How, if at all, does the awareness of living in a new geological epoch defined by the actions of human beings affect the objects of memory, the scales of remembrance, and the field’s humanist underpinnings?”
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
in press
subject
keyword
memory studies, Anthropocene, geology, scale, nonhuman
journal title
MEMORY STUDIES
volume
11
issue
4
publisher
SAGE Publications
ISSN
1750-6980
1750-6999
DOI
10.1177/1750698017731068
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
8534697
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8534697
date created
2017-10-18 14:47:51
date last changed
2017-10-20 11:25:21
@article{8534697,
  abstract     = {The essays gathered here are slightly revised versions of the position papers presented as part of the roundtable on {\textquotedblleft}Memory Studies and the Anthropocene{\textquotedblright} at the MLA Convention in Philadelphia in January 2017. What sparked this roundtable is the increasing currency of the Anthropocene, on the one hand, and the observation that the field of memory studies has lately begun to grapple with its implications in earnest, on the other. The participants, all of them leading scholars in the fields of memory studies and/or the environmental humanities, had been asked to respond to the following questions: {\textquotedblleft}What are the implications of the notion of the Anthropocene for memory studies? How, if at all, does the awareness of living in a new geological epoch defined by the actions of human beings affect the objects of memory, the scales of remembrance, and the field{\textquoteright}s humanist underpinnings?{\textquotedblright}},
  author       = {Craps, Stef and Crownshaw, Rick and Wenzel, Jennifer and Kennedy, Rosanne and Colebrook, Claire and Nardizzi, Vin},
  issn         = {1750-6980},
  journal      = {MEMORY STUDIES},
  keyword      = {memory studies,Anthropocene,geology,scale,nonhuman},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  publisher    = {SAGE Publications},
  title        = {Memory Studies and the Anthropocene: A Roundtable},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1750698017731068},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2018},
}

Chicago
Craps, Stef, Rick Crownshaw, Jennifer Wenzel, Rosanne Kennedy, Claire Colebrook, and Vin Nardizzi. 2018. “Memory Studies and the Anthropocene: A Roundtable.” Memory Studies 11 (4).
APA
Craps, S., Crownshaw, R., Wenzel, J., Kennedy, R., Colebrook, C., & Nardizzi, V. (2018). Memory Studies and the Anthropocene: A Roundtable. MEMORY STUDIES, 11(4).
Vancouver
1.
Craps S, Crownshaw R, Wenzel J, Kennedy R, Colebrook C, Nardizzi V. Memory Studies and the Anthropocene: A Roundtable. MEMORY STUDIES. SAGE Publications; 2018;11(4).
MLA
Craps, Stef, Rick Crownshaw, Jennifer Wenzel, et al. “Memory Studies and the Anthropocene: A Roundtable.” MEMORY STUDIES 11.4 (2018): n. pag. Print.