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Multigenerational effects of the antibiotic tetracycline on transcriptional responses of Daphnia magna and its relationship to higher levels of biological organizations

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Abstract
Given the risk of environmental pollution by pharmaceutical compounds and the effects of these compounds on exposed ecosystems, ecologically relevant and realistic assessments are required. However, many studies have been mostly focused on individual responses in a single generation exposed to one-effect concentrations. Here, transcriptional responses of the crustacean Daphnia magna to the antibiotic tetracycline across multiple generations and effect concentrations were investigated. The results demonstrated that tetracycline induced different transcriptional responses of daphnids that were dependent on dose and generation. For example, reproduction-related expressed sequence tags (ESTs), including vitellogenin, were distinctly related to the dose-dependent tetracycline exposure, whereas multigenerational exposure induced significant change of molting-related ESTs such as cuticle protein. A total of 65 ESTs were shared in all contrasts, suggesting a conserved mechanism of tetracycline toxicity regardless of exposure concentration or time. Most of them were associated with general stress responses including translation, protein and carbohydrate metabolism, and oxidative phosphorylation. In addition, effects across the dose-response curve showed higher correlative connections among transcriptional, physiological, and individual responses than multigenerational effects. In the multigenerational exposure, the connectivity between adjacent generations decreased with increasing generation number. The results dearly highlight that exposure concentration and time trigger different mechanisms and functions, providing further evidence that multigenerational and dose-response effects cannot be neglected in environmental risk assessment.
Keywords
PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS, REPRODUCTIVE TOXICITY, AQUATIC ENVIRONMENT, MATERNAL TRANSFER, GENE-EXPRESSION, CDNA MICROARRAY, PHARMACEUTICALS, POPULATION, EXPOSURE, PULEX

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Chicago
Kim, Hyun Young, Jana Asselman, Tae Yong Jeong, Seungho Yu, Karel De Schamphelaere, and Sang D Kim. 2017. “Multigenerational Effects of the Antibiotic Tetracycline on Transcriptional Responses of Daphnia Magna and Its Relationship to Higher Levels of Biological Organizations.” Environmental Science & Technology 51: 12898–12907.
APA
Kim, H. Y., Asselman, J., Jeong, T. Y., Yu, S., De Schamphelaere, K., & Kim, S. D. (2017). Multigenerational effects of the antibiotic tetracycline on transcriptional responses of Daphnia magna and its relationship to higher levels of biological organizations. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 51, 12898–12907.
Vancouver
1.
Kim HY, Asselman J, Jeong TY, Yu S, De Schamphelaere K, Kim SD. Multigenerational effects of the antibiotic tetracycline on transcriptional responses of Daphnia magna and its relationship to higher levels of biological organizations. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY. 2017;51:12898–907.
MLA
Kim, Hyun Young, Jana Asselman, Tae Yong Jeong, et al. “Multigenerational Effects of the Antibiotic Tetracycline on Transcriptional Responses of Daphnia Magna and Its Relationship to Higher Levels of Biological Organizations.” ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY 51 (2017): 12898–12907. Print.
@article{8534266,
  abstract     = {Given the risk of environmental pollution by pharmaceutical compounds and the effects of these compounds on exposed ecosystems, ecologically relevant and realistic assessments are required. However, many studies have been mostly focused on individual responses in a single generation exposed to one-effect concentrations. Here, transcriptional responses of the crustacean Daphnia magna to the antibiotic tetracycline across multiple generations and effect concentrations were investigated. The results demonstrated that tetracycline induced different transcriptional responses of daphnids that were dependent on dose and generation. For example, reproduction-related expressed sequence tags (ESTs), including vitellogenin, were distinctly related to the dose-dependent tetracycline exposure, whereas multigenerational exposure induced significant change of molting-related ESTs such as cuticle protein. A total of 65 ESTs were shared in all contrasts, suggesting a conserved mechanism of tetracycline toxicity regardless of exposure concentration or time. Most of them were associated with general stress responses including translation, protein and carbohydrate metabolism, and oxidative phosphorylation. In addition, effects across the dose-response curve showed higher correlative connections among transcriptional, physiological, and individual responses than multigenerational effects. In the multigenerational exposure, the connectivity between adjacent generations decreased with increasing generation number. The results dearly highlight that exposure concentration and time trigger different mechanisms and functions, providing further evidence that multigenerational and dose-response effects cannot be neglected in environmental risk assessment.},
  author       = {Kim, Hyun Young and Asselman, Jana and Jeong, Tae Yong and Yu, Seungho and De Schamphelaere, Karel and Kim, Sang D},
  issn         = {0013-936X},
  journal      = {ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE \& TECHNOLOGY},
  keyword      = {PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS,REPRODUCTIVE TOXICITY,AQUATIC ENVIRONMENT,MATERNAL TRANSFER,GENE-EXPRESSION,CDNA MICROARRAY,PHARMACEUTICALS,POPULATION,EXPOSURE,PULEX},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {12898--12907},
  title        = {Multigenerational effects of the antibiotic tetracycline on transcriptional responses of Daphnia magna and its relationship to higher levels of biological organizations},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.7b05050},
  volume       = {51},
  year         = {2017},
}

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