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Discursive community construction through collaborative digital neighborhood storytelling

(2017)
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Abstract
Local information exchange is often considered a crucial aspect for the viability of an urban neighborhood (Barnett & Townend, 2014). This exchange happens within and across various storytelling levels (Ball-Rokeach, Kim & Matei, 2001). A typical midlevel example of local storytelling agents are the so-called hyperlocal media. Hyperlocal media are often considered to be organized entities, deliberately set up with a journalistic purpose, employing paid or voluntary journalists, and having the normative ideal of fostering local civic engagement (Metzgar, Kurpius & Rowley, 2011). These organized hyperlocal media operations seem however not to be the only mezzo level agents in the storytelling structure of a neighborhood. Recently, we see the emergence of bottom-up and unstructured Facebook-groups, set up by residents to aggregate both residents and information concerning a specific locality such as an urban neighborhood. In these online spaces we notice how people share information and news related to the neighborhood, announce and promote events, or report particular neighborhood related problems. These observations raise the question as to what extent these bottom-up online environments show the same qualities and have the same consequences that are typically attributed to hyperlocal media operations. By combining a content analysis of a sample of these Facebook-groups and in-depth interviews we investigate to what extent these Facebook-groups can be considered hyperlocal media, both in terms of content and consequences. In order to make sense of the collected data, we rely on the conceptual lenses of network media logic (Klinger & Svenson, 2014) and social capital (Hess, 2013).
Keywords
Hyperlocal media, Facebook, Urban Neighborhoods, Community Construction, In-depth Interviews

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
De Meulenaere, Jonas. 2017. “Discursive Community Construction Through Collaborative Digital Neighborhood Storytelling.” In .
APA
De Meulenaere, Jonas. (2017). Discursive community construction through collaborative digital neighborhood storytelling. Presented at the GeoMedia 2017 Spaces of the in-between.
Vancouver
1.
De Meulenaere J. Discursive community construction through collaborative digital neighborhood storytelling. 2017.
MLA
De Meulenaere, Jonas. “Discursive Community Construction Through Collaborative Digital Neighborhood Storytelling.” 2017. Print.
@inproceedings{8533950,
  abstract     = {Local information exchange is often considered a crucial aspect for the viability of an urban
neighborhood (Barnett \& Townend, 2014). This exchange happens within and across various
storytelling levels (Ball-Rokeach, Kim \& Matei, 2001). A typical midlevel example of local
storytelling agents are the so-called hyperlocal media. Hyperlocal media are often considered to
be organized entities, deliberately set up with a journalistic purpose, employing paid or voluntary
journalists, and having the normative ideal of fostering local civic engagement (Metzgar, Kurpius
\& Rowley, 2011). These organized hyperlocal media operations seem however not to be the only
mezzo level agents in the storytelling structure of a neighborhood. Recently, we see the
emergence of bottom-up and unstructured Facebook-groups, set up by residents to aggregate both
residents and information concerning a specific locality such as an urban neighborhood. In these
online spaces we notice how people share information and news related to the neighborhood,
announce and promote events, or report particular neighborhood related problems. These
observations raise the question as to what extent these bottom-up online environments show the
same qualities and have the same consequences that are typically attributed to hyperlocal media
operations. By combining a content analysis of a sample of these Facebook-groups and in-depth
interviews we investigate to what extent these Facebook-groups can be considered hyperlocal
media, both in terms of content and consequences. In order to make sense of the collected data,
we rely on the conceptual lenses of network media logic (Klinger \& Svenson, 2014) and social
capital (Hess, 2013).},
  author       = {De Meulenaere, Jonas},
  location     = {Karlstad, Sweden},
  title        = {Discursive community construction through collaborative digital neighborhood storytelling},
  year         = {2017},
}