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Mycotoxigenic potentials of Fusarium species in various culture matrices revealed by mycotoxin profiling

Wen Shi, Yanglan Tan, Shuangxia Wang, Donald M Gardiner, Sarah De Saeger UGent, Yucai Liao, Cheng Wang, Yingying Fan, Zhouping Wang and Aibo Wu (2017) TOXINS. 9(1).
abstract
In this study, twenty of the most common Fusarium species were molecularly characterized and inoculated on potato dextrose agar (PDA), rice and maize medium, where thirty three targeted mycotoxins, which might be the secondary metabolites of the identified fungal species, were detected by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Statistical analysis was performed with principal component analysis (PCA) to characterize the mycotoxin profiles for the twenty fungi, suggesting that these fungi species could be discriminated and divided into three groups as follows. Group I, the fusaric acid producers, were defined into two subgroups, namely subgroup I as producers of fusaric acid and fumonisins, comprising of F. proliferatum, F. verticillioides, F. fujikuroi and F. solani, and subgroup II considered to only produce fusaric acid, including F. temperatum, F. subglutinans, F. musae, F. tricinctum, F. oxysporum, F. equiseti, F. sacchari, F. concentricum, F. andiyazi. Group II, as type A trichothecenes producers, included F. langsethiae, F. sporotrichioides, F. polyphialidicum, while Group III were found to mainly produce type B trichothecenes, comprising of F. culmorum, F. poae, F. meridionale and F. graminearum. A comprehensive picture, which presents the mycotoxin-producing patterns by the selected fungal species in various matrices, is obtained for the first time, and thus from an application point of view, provides key information to explore mycotoxigenic potentials of Fusarium species and forecast the Fusarium infestation/mycotoxins contamination.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
HEAD BLIGHT, EAR ROT, FUMONISIN PRODUCTION, NATURAL OCCURRENCE, GRAMINEARUM CLADE, GENETIC DIVERSITY, SUGAR-BEETS, ZEA-MAYS, WHEAT, TRICHOTHECENES, Fusarium fungi, mycotoxin profiles, principal component analysis, culture substrates
journal title
TOXINS
Toxins
volume
9
issue
1
issue title
Selected papers from the 5th international symposium on mycotoxins and toxigenic moulds : challenges and perspectives
article number
6
pages
15 pages
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000392980000006
ISSN
2072-6651
DOI
10.3390/toxins9010006
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0)
id
8530411
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8530411
date created
2017-09-06 14:34:25
date last changed
2017-09-12 14:26:39
@article{8530411,
  abstract     = {In this study, twenty of the most common Fusarium species were molecularly characterized and inoculated on potato dextrose agar (PDA), rice and maize medium, where thirty three targeted mycotoxins, which might be the secondary metabolites of the identified fungal species, were detected by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Statistical analysis was performed with principal component analysis (PCA) to characterize the mycotoxin profiles for the twenty fungi, suggesting that these fungi species could be discriminated and divided into three groups as follows. Group I, the fusaric acid producers, were defined into two subgroups, namely subgroup I as producers of fusaric acid and fumonisins, comprising of F. proliferatum, F. verticillioides, F. fujikuroi and F. solani, and subgroup II considered to only produce fusaric acid, including F. temperatum, F. subglutinans, F. musae, F. tricinctum, F. oxysporum, F. equiseti, F. sacchari, F. concentricum, F. andiyazi. Group II, as type A trichothecenes producers, included F. langsethiae, F. sporotrichioides, F. polyphialidicum, while Group III were found to mainly produce type B trichothecenes, comprising of F. culmorum, F. poae, F. meridionale and F. graminearum. A comprehensive picture, which presents the mycotoxin-producing patterns by the selected fungal species in various matrices, is obtained for the first time, and thus from an application point of view, provides key information to explore mycotoxigenic potentials of Fusarium species and forecast the Fusarium infestation/mycotoxins contamination.},
  articleno    = {6},
  author       = {Shi, Wen and Tan, Yanglan and Wang, Shuangxia and Gardiner, Donald M and De Saeger, Sarah and Liao, Yucai and Wang, Cheng and Fan, Yingying and Wang, Zhouping and Wu, Aibo},
  issn         = {2072-6651},
  journal      = {TOXINS},
  keyword      = {HEAD BLIGHT,EAR ROT,FUMONISIN PRODUCTION,NATURAL OCCURRENCE,GRAMINEARUM CLADE,GENETIC DIVERSITY,SUGAR-BEETS,ZEA-MAYS,WHEAT,TRICHOTHECENES,Fusarium fungi,mycotoxin profiles,principal component analysis,culture substrates},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {15},
  title        = {Mycotoxigenic potentials of Fusarium species in various culture matrices revealed by mycotoxin profiling},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/toxins9010006},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2017},
}

Chicago
Shi, Wen, Yanglan Tan, Shuangxia Wang, Donald M Gardiner, Sarah De Saeger, Yucai Liao, Cheng Wang, Yingying Fan, Zhouping Wang, and Aibo Wu. 2017. “Mycotoxigenic Potentials of Fusarium Species in Various Culture Matrices Revealed by Mycotoxin Profiling.” Toxins 9 (1).
APA
Shi, Wen, Tan, Y., Wang, S., Gardiner, D. M., De Saeger, S., Liao, Y., Wang, C., et al. (2017). Mycotoxigenic potentials of Fusarium species in various culture matrices revealed by mycotoxin profiling. TOXINS, 9(1).
Vancouver
1.
Shi W, Tan Y, Wang S, Gardiner DM, De Saeger S, Liao Y, et al. Mycotoxigenic potentials of Fusarium species in various culture matrices revealed by mycotoxin profiling. TOXINS. 2017;9(1).
MLA
Shi, Wen, Yanglan Tan, Shuangxia Wang, et al. “Mycotoxigenic Potentials of Fusarium Species in Various Culture Matrices Revealed by Mycotoxin Profiling.” TOXINS 9.1 (2017): n. pag. Print.