Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

Mechanisms and consequences of carbamoylation.

Sigurd Delanghe UGent, Joris Delanghe UGent, Reinhart Speeckaert, Wim Van Biesen UGent and Marijn Speeckaert UGent (2017) NATURE REVIEWS NEPHROLOGY. 13(9). p.580-593
abstract
Protein carbamoylation is a non-enzymatic post-translational modification that binds isocyanic acid, which can be derived from the dissociation of urea or from the myeloperoxidase-mediated catabolism of thiocyanate, to the free amino groups of a multitude of proteins. Although the term 'carbamoylation' is usually replaced by the term "carbamylation" in the literature, carbamylation refers to a different chemical reaction (the reversible interaction of CO2 with α and ε-amino groups of proteins). Depending on the altered molecule (for example, collagen, erythropoietin, haemoglobin, low-density lipoprotein or high-density lipoprotein), carbamoylation can have different pathophysiological effects. Carbamoylated proteins have been linked to atherosclerosis, lipid metabolism, immune system dysfunction (such as inhibition of the classical complement pathway, inhibition of complement-dependent rituximab cytotoxicity, reduced oxidative neutrophil burst, and the formation of anti-carbamoylated protein antibodies) and renal fibrosis. In this Review, we discuss the carbamoylation process and evaluate the available biomarkers of carbamoylation (for example, homocitrulline, the percentage of carbamoylated albumin, carbamoylated haemoglobin, and carbamoylated low-density lipoprotein). We also discuss the relationship between carbamoylation and the occurrence of cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease and assess the effects of strategies to lower the carbamoylation load.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (review)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
LOW-DENSITY-LIPOPROTEIN, STAGE RENAL-DISEASE, CHRONIC KIDNEY-DISEASE, CORONARY-ARTERY-DISEASE, MAINTENANCE DIALYSIS PATIENTS, RHEUMATOID-ARTHRITIS PATIENTS, SERUM MYELOPEROXIDASE LEVELS, TYPE-2 DIABETES-MELLITUS, LIPID-LOWERING THERAPY, HUMAN BLOOD MONOCYTES
journal title
NATURE REVIEWS NEPHROLOGY
Nat. Rev. Nephrol.
volume
13
issue
9
pages
580 - 593
Web of Science type
Review
Web of Science id
000407858400013
ISSN
1759-5061
1759-507X
DOI
10.1038/nrneph.2017.103.
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
8529596
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8529596
date created
2017-08-25 08:13:14
date last changed
2017-10-11 09:51:33
@article{8529596,
  abstract     = {Protein carbamoylation is a non-enzymatic post-translational modification that binds isocyanic acid, which can be derived from the dissociation of urea or from the myeloperoxidase-mediated catabolism of thiocyanate, to the free amino groups of a multitude of proteins. Although the term 'carbamoylation' is usually replaced by the term {\textacutedbl}carbamylation{\textacutedbl} in the literature, carbamylation refers to a different chemical reaction (the reversible interaction of CO2 with \ensuremath{\alpha} and \ensuremath{\epsilon}-amino groups of proteins). Depending on the altered molecule (for example, collagen, erythropoietin, haemoglobin, low-density lipoprotein or high-density lipoprotein), carbamoylation can have different pathophysiological effects. Carbamoylated proteins have been linked to atherosclerosis, lipid metabolism, immune system dysfunction (such as inhibition of the classical complement pathway, inhibition of complement-dependent rituximab cytotoxicity, reduced oxidative neutrophil burst, and the formation of anti-carbamoylated protein antibodies) and renal fibrosis. In this Review, we discuss the carbamoylation process and evaluate the available biomarkers of carbamoylation (for example, homocitrulline, the percentage of carbamoylated albumin, carbamoylated haemoglobin, and carbamoylated low-density lipoprotein). We also discuss the relationship between carbamoylation and the occurrence of cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease and assess the effects of strategies to lower the carbamoylation load.},
  author       = {Delanghe, Sigurd and Delanghe, Joris and Speeckaert, Reinhart and Van Biesen, Wim and Speeckaert, Marijn},
  issn         = {1759-5061},
  journal      = {NATURE REVIEWS NEPHROLOGY},
  keyword      = {LOW-DENSITY-LIPOPROTEIN,STAGE RENAL-DISEASE,CHRONIC KIDNEY-DISEASE,CORONARY-ARTERY-DISEASE,MAINTENANCE DIALYSIS PATIENTS,RHEUMATOID-ARTHRITIS PATIENTS,SERUM MYELOPEROXIDASE LEVELS,TYPE-2 DIABETES-MELLITUS,LIPID-LOWERING THERAPY,HUMAN BLOOD MONOCYTES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {580--593},
  title        = {Mechanisms and consequences of carbamoylation.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nrneph.2017.103.},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2017},
}

Chicago
Delanghe, Sigurd, Joris Delanghe, REINHART SPEECKAERT, Wim Van Biesen, and Marijn Speeckaert. 2017. “Mechanisms and Consequences of Carbamoylation.” Nature Reviews Nephrology 13 (9): 580–593.
APA
Delanghe, S., Delanghe, J., SPEECKAERT, R., Van Biesen, W., & Speeckaert, M. (2017). Mechanisms and consequences of carbamoylation. NATURE REVIEWS NEPHROLOGY, 13(9), 580–593.
Vancouver
1.
Delanghe S, Delanghe J, SPEECKAERT R, Van Biesen W, Speeckaert M. Mechanisms and consequences of carbamoylation. NATURE REVIEWS NEPHROLOGY. 2017;13(9):580–93.
MLA
Delanghe, Sigurd, Joris Delanghe, REINHART SPEECKAERT, et al. “Mechanisms and Consequences of Carbamoylation.” NATURE REVIEWS NEPHROLOGY 13.9 (2017): 580–593. Print.