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Severe hypertension with renal thrombotic microangiopathy : what happened to the usual suspect?

Steven Van Laecke (UGent) and Wim Van Biesen (UGent)
(2017) KIDNEY INTERNATIONAL. 91(6). p.1271-1274
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Abstract
Patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) and malignant hypertension can both present with concomitant hypertension and thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), rendering policy decisions complex. Timmermans et al. report that patients with severe hypertension and renal TMA might have unrecognized aHUS with underlying complement abnormalities. Based on this, they assert that all patients presenting with severe hypertension and renal TMA should be evaluated for aHUS. It remains uncertain whether this holds equally true for patients with malignant hypertension and renal TMA.
Keywords
MALIGNANT HYPERTENSION, COMMON DENOMINATOR, COMPLEMENT

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Chicago
Van Laecke, Steven, and Wim Van Biesen. 2017. “Severe Hypertension with Renal Thrombotic Microangiopathy : What Happened to the Usual Suspect?” Kidney International.
APA
Van Laecke, S., & Van Biesen, W. (2017). Severe hypertension with renal thrombotic microangiopathy : what happened to the usual suspect? KIDNEY INTERNATIONAL.
Vancouver
1.
Van Laecke S, Van Biesen W. Severe hypertension with renal thrombotic microangiopathy : what happened to the usual suspect? KIDNEY INTERNATIONAL. 2017. p. 1271–4.
MLA
Van Laecke, Steven, and Wim Van Biesen. “Severe Hypertension with Renal Thrombotic Microangiopathy : What Happened to the Usual Suspect?” KIDNEY INTERNATIONAL 2017 : 1271–1274. Print.
@misc{8529242,
  abstract     = {Patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) and malignant hypertension can both present with concomitant hypertension and thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), rendering policy decisions complex. Timmermans et al. report that patients with severe hypertension and renal TMA might have unrecognized aHUS with underlying complement abnormalities. Based on this, they assert that all patients presenting with severe hypertension and renal TMA should be evaluated for aHUS. It remains uncertain whether this holds equally true for patients with malignant hypertension and renal TMA.},
  author       = {Van Laecke, Steven and Van Biesen, Wim},
  issn         = {0085-2538},
  keyword      = {MALIGNANT HYPERTENSION,COMMON DENOMINATOR,COMPLEMENT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1271--1274},
  series       = {KIDNEY INTERNATIONAL},
  title        = {Severe hypertension with renal thrombotic microangiopathy : what happened to the usual suspect?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.kint.2017.02.025},
  volume       = {91},
  year         = {2017},
}

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