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From stochastic foam to designed structure : balancing cost and performance of cellular metals

(2017) MATERIALS . 10(8).
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Abstract
Over the past two decades, a large number of metallic foams have been developed. In recent years research on this multi-functional material class has further intensified. However, despite their unique properties only a limited number of large-scale applications have emerged. One important reason for this sluggish uptake is their high cost. Many cellular metals require expensive raw materials, complex manufacturing procedures, or a combination thereof. Some attempts have been made to decrease costs by introducing novel foams based on cheaper components and new manufacturing procedures. However, this has often yielded materials with unreliable properties that inhibit utilization of their full potential. The resulting balance between cost and performance of cellular metals is probed in this editorial, which attempts to consider cost not in absolute figures, but in relation to performance. To approach such a distinction, an alternative classification of cellular metals is suggested which centers on structural aspects and the effort of realizing them. The range thus covered extends from fully stochastic foams to cellular structures designed-to-purpose.
Keywords
metal foam, manufacturing, review paper

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Lehmhus, Dirk, Matej Vesenjak, Sven De Schampheleire, and Thomas Fiedler. 2017. “From Stochastic Foam to Designed Structure : Balancing Cost and Performance of Cellular Metals.” Materials  10 (8).
APA
Lehmhus, D., Vesenjak, M., De Schampheleire, S., & Fiedler, T. (2017). From stochastic foam to designed structure : balancing cost and performance of cellular metals. MATERIALS  , 10(8).
Vancouver
1.
Lehmhus D, Vesenjak M, De Schampheleire S, Fiedler T. From stochastic foam to designed structure : balancing cost and performance of cellular metals. MATERIALS  . MDPI AG; 2017;10(8).
MLA
Lehmhus, Dirk et al. “From Stochastic Foam to Designed Structure : Balancing Cost and Performance of Cellular Metals.” MATERIALS  10.8 (2017): n. pag. Print.
@article{8528824,
  abstract     = {Over the past two decades, a large number of metallic foams have been developed. In recent
years research on this multi-functional material class has further intensified. However, despite their
unique properties only a limited number of large-scale applications have emerged. One important
reason for this sluggish uptake is their high cost. Many cellular metals require expensive raw
materials, complex manufacturing procedures, or a combination thereof. Some attempts have
been made to decrease costs by introducing novel foams based on cheaper components and new
manufacturing procedures. However, this has often yielded materials with unreliable properties
that inhibit utilization of their full potential. The resulting balance between cost and performance of
cellular metals is probed in this editorial, which attempts to consider cost not in absolute figures, but
in relation to performance. To approach such a distinction, an alternative classification of cellular
metals is suggested which centers on structural aspects and the effort of realizing them. The range
thus covered extends from fully stochastic foams to cellular structures designed-to-purpose.},
  author       = {Lehmhus, Dirk and Vesenjak, Matej and De Schampheleire, Sven and Fiedler, Thomas},
  issn         = {1996-1944},
  journal      = {MATERIALS   },
  keywords     = {metal foam,manufacturing,review paper},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  publisher    = {MDPI AG},
  title        = {From stochastic foam to designed structure : balancing cost and performance of cellular metals},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ma10080922},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2017},
}

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