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Joseph-Jonas Dumonts gevangenisontwerpen : 'architecture parlante' in neo-Tudorstijl

(2017) PRO MEMORIE. 19(1). p.72-87
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Abstract
Introducing the strictly cellular regime after being appointed General Inspector of Prisons in Belgium in 1830, Edouard Ducpétiaux soon initiated an extensive building campaign of cellular prisons. Until his death in 1859, Joseph-Jonas Dumont was Belgium’s preeminent prison architect. Inspired by Anglo-Saxon trends, he adopted the Tudor revival style for the prison gatehouse in most of his designs. This idiom proved to be particularly suitable for effectuating the nineteenth-century concept of ‘style’ as a medium of meaning(s). Not only the formal and functional resemblance with Tudor gatehouses and city gates, but also the military features and general heaviness of the decorum evoked the appropriate connotations of custody, authority and dimness to act as a (physical but especially psychological) deterrent for the potential criminal, while at the same time demonstrating the architect’s artistic creativity
Keywords
Prison Architecture, Cellular Prison, Gatehouse, Tudor Revival, Gothic Revival, Joseph-Jonas Dumont, Édouard Ducpétiaux

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Citation

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Chicago
Feyaerts, Jozefien. 2017. “Joseph-Jonas Dumonts Gevangenisontwerpen : ‘Architecture Parlante’ in neo-Tudorstijl.” Pro Memorie 19 (1): 72–87.
APA
Feyaerts, Jozefien. (2017). Joseph-Jonas Dumonts gevangenisontwerpen : “architecture parlante” in neo-Tudorstijl. PRO MEMORIE, 19(1), 72–87.
Vancouver
1.
Feyaerts J. Joseph-Jonas Dumonts gevangenisontwerpen : “architecture parlante” in neo-Tudorstijl. PRO MEMORIE. Hilversum: Uitgeverij Verloren; 2017;19(1):72–87.
MLA
Feyaerts, Jozefien. “Joseph-Jonas Dumonts Gevangenisontwerpen : ‘Architecture Parlante’ in neo-Tudorstijl.” PRO MEMORIE 19.1 (2017): 72–87. Print.
@article{8528059,
  abstract     = {Introducing the strictly cellular regime after being appointed General Inspector of Prisons in Belgium in 1830, Edouard Ducpétiaux soon initiated an extensive building campaign of cellular prisons. Until his death in 1859, Joseph-Jonas Dumont was Belgium’s preeminent prison architect. Inspired by Anglo-Saxon trends, he adopted the Tudor revival style for the prison gatehouse in most of his designs. This idiom proved to be particularly suitable for effectuating the nineteenth-century concept of ‘style’ as a medium of meaning(s). Not only the formal and functional resemblance with Tudor gatehouses and city gates, but also the military features and general heaviness of the decorum evoked the appropriate connotations of custody, authority and dimness to act as a (physical but especially psychological) deterrent for the potential criminal, while at the same time demonstrating the architect’s artistic creativity},
  author       = {Feyaerts, Jozefien},
  issn         = {1566-7146},
  journal      = {PRO MEMORIE},
  keywords     = {Prison Architecture,Cellular Prison,Gatehouse,Tudor Revival,Gothic Revival,Joseph-Jonas Dumont,Édouard Ducpétiaux},
  language     = {dut},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {72--87},
  publisher    = {Uitgeverij Verloren},
  title        = {Joseph-Jonas Dumonts gevangenisontwerpen : 'architecture parlante' in neo-Tudorstijl},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2017},
}