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Changes in cytokine profiles following treatment with food allergen-specific sublingual immunotherapy in dogs with adverse food reactions

Elisa Maina UGent, Bert Devriendt UGent and Eric Cox UGent (2017) VETERINARY DERMATOLOGY. 28(6). p.612-e149
abstract
Background : Food allergen-specific sublingual immunotherapy (FA-SLIT) is considered to be a novel, safe and effective approach in dogs with adverse food reactions (AFR). Hypothesis/Objectives : To investigate changes in key cytokines associated with FA-SLIT. Animals : Eleven dogs with confirmed AFR. Methods : Participants received either dose escalation of FA-SLIT or placebo over a six month period. Oral food challenge was performed at the beginning and end of the study, along with clinical examinations and collection of skin surface bacterial cytology and blood. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with the culprit food antigen. ELISA methods were used to quantify Interleukin (IL)-10, IFN-c, IL-4 and IL-17A in the supernatant of stimulated cells. Results : IL-10 and IFN-c levels were significantly increased at the end of the study in the treatment group (T), compared with the placebo group (P), whereas no changes were found in IL-4 levels. IL-17A levels were decreased in both groups (but more profoundly in T). Bacterial scores on the skin were positively correlated with IL-17A and inversely correlated with IL-10 concentrations. Interleukins were not correlated with clinical scores. Conclusion and clinical importance : FA-SLIT may modulate the allergic response toward Th1 and Treg cell phenotypes, and induction of tolerance in dogs with AFR. Therefore, FA-SLIT may be a tool to desensitize dogs with AFR. However, more data on a larger number of cases and a broader panel of cytokines are needed to corroborate these findings, and to elucidate the mechanism of action for responses to FA-SLIT by dogs with AFR.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Food allergy, Sublingual immunotherapy, cytokine response, T cell phenotype
journal title
VETERINARY DERMATOLOGY
Vet. Dermatol.
volume
28
issue
6
pages
612 - e149
ISSN
0959-4493
DOI
10.1111/vde.12463
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
8527848
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8527848
date created
2017-07-31 09:11:43
date last changed
2017-11-13 11:43:29
@article{8527848,
  abstract     = {Background : Food allergen-specific sublingual immunotherapy (FA-SLIT) is considered to be a novel, safe and effective approach in dogs with adverse food reactions (AFR).
Hypothesis/Objectives : To investigate changes in key cytokines associated with FA-SLIT.
Animals : Eleven dogs with confirmed AFR.
Methods : Participants received either dose escalation of FA-SLIT or placebo over a six month period. Oral food challenge was performed at the beginning and end of the study, along with clinical examinations and collection of skin surface bacterial cytology and blood. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with the culprit food antigen. ELISA methods were used to quantify Interleukin (IL)-10, IFN-c, IL-4 and IL-17A in the supernatant of stimulated cells.
Results : IL-10 and IFN-c levels were significantly increased at the end of the study in the treatment group (T), compared with the placebo group (P), whereas no changes were found in IL-4 levels. IL-17A levels were decreased in both groups (but more profoundly in T). Bacterial scores on the skin were positively correlated with IL-17A and inversely correlated with IL-10 concentrations. Interleukins were not correlated with clinical scores.
Conclusion and clinical importance : FA-SLIT may modulate the allergic response toward Th1 and Treg cell phenotypes, and induction of tolerance in dogs with AFR. Therefore, FA-SLIT may be a tool to desensitize dogs with AFR. However, more data on a larger number of cases and a broader panel of cytokines are needed to corroborate these findings, and to elucidate the mechanism of action for responses to FA-SLIT by dogs with AFR.},
  author       = {Maina, Elisa and Devriendt, Bert and Cox, Eric},
  issn         = {0959-4493},
  journal      = {VETERINARY DERMATOLOGY},
  keyword      = {Food allergy,Sublingual immunotherapy,cytokine response,T cell phenotype},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {612--e149},
  title        = {Changes in cytokine profiles following treatment with food allergen-specific sublingual immunotherapy in dogs with adverse food reactions},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/vde.12463},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {2017},
}

Chicago
Maina, Elisa, Bert Devriendt, and Eric Cox. 2017. “Changes in Cytokine Profiles Following Treatment with Food Allergen-specific Sublingual Immunotherapy in Dogs with Adverse Food Reactions.” Veterinary Dermatology 28 (6): 612–e149.
APA
Maina, Elisa, Devriendt, B., & Cox, E. (2017). Changes in cytokine profiles following treatment with food allergen-specific sublingual immunotherapy in dogs with adverse food reactions. VETERINARY DERMATOLOGY, 28(6), 612–e149.
Vancouver
1.
Maina E, Devriendt B, Cox E. Changes in cytokine profiles following treatment with food allergen-specific sublingual immunotherapy in dogs with adverse food reactions. VETERINARY DERMATOLOGY. 2017;28(6):612–e149.
MLA
Maina, Elisa, Bert Devriendt, and Eric Cox. “Changes in Cytokine Profiles Following Treatment with Food Allergen-specific Sublingual Immunotherapy in Dogs with Adverse Food Reactions.” VETERINARY DERMATOLOGY 28.6 (2017): 612–e149. Print.