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The evolutionary significance of polyploidy

(2017) NATURE REVIEWS GENETICS. 18(7). p.411-424
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Bioinformatics: from nucleotids to networks (N2N)
Abstract
Polyploidy, or the duplication of entire genomes, has been observed in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, and in somatic and germ cells. The consequences of polyploidization are complex and variable, and they differ greatly between systems (clonal or non-clonal) and species, but the process has often been considered to be an evolutionary 'dead end'. Here, we review the accumulating evidence that correlates polyploidization with environmental change or stress, and that has led to an increased recognition of its short-term adaptive potential. In addition, we discuss how, once polyploidy has been established, the unique retention profile of duplicated genes following whole-genome duplication might explain key longer-term evolutionary transitions and a general increase in biological complexity.
Keywords
WHOLE-GENOME DUPLICATION, STILL DONT KNOW, GENE-EXPRESSION, CHROMOSOMAL INSTABILITY, ANGIOSPERM DIVERSIFICATION, EARLY VERTEBRATES, DECCAN VOLCANISM, PLANT POLYPLOIDS, CLIMATIC NICHES, K/PG BOUNDARY

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Van de Peer, Yves, Eshchar Mizrachi, and Kathleen Marchal. 2017. “The Evolutionary Significance of Polyploidy.” Nature Reviews Genetics 18 (7): 411–424.
APA
Van de Peer, Y., Mizrachi, E., & Marchal, K. (2017). The evolutionary significance of polyploidy. NATURE REVIEWS GENETICS, 18(7), 411–424.
Vancouver
1.
Van de Peer Y, Mizrachi E, Marchal K. The evolutionary significance of polyploidy. NATURE REVIEWS GENETICS. 2017;18(7):411–24.
MLA
Van de Peer, Yves, Eshchar Mizrachi, and Kathleen Marchal. “The Evolutionary Significance of Polyploidy.” NATURE REVIEWS GENETICS 18.7 (2017): 411–424. Print.
@article{8526799,
  abstract     = {Polyploidy, or the duplication of entire genomes, has been observed in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, and in somatic and germ cells. The consequences of polyploidization are complex and variable, and they differ greatly between systems (clonal or non-clonal) and species, but the process has often been considered to be an evolutionary 'dead end'. Here, we review the accumulating evidence that correlates polyploidization with environmental change or stress, and that has led to an increased recognition of its short-term adaptive potential. In addition, we discuss how, once polyploidy has been established, the unique retention profile of duplicated genes following whole-genome duplication might explain key longer-term evolutionary transitions and a general increase in biological complexity.},
  author       = {Van de Peer, Yves and Mizrachi, Eshchar and Marchal, Kathleen},
  issn         = {1471-0056},
  journal      = {NATURE REVIEWS GENETICS},
  keyword      = {WHOLE-GENOME DUPLICATION,STILL DONT KNOW,GENE-EXPRESSION,CHROMOSOMAL INSTABILITY,ANGIOSPERM DIVERSIFICATION,EARLY VERTEBRATES,DECCAN VOLCANISM,PLANT POLYPLOIDS,CLIMATIC NICHES,K/PG BOUNDARY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {411--424},
  title        = {The evolutionary significance of polyploidy},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nrg.2017.26},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2017},
}

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