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Microstructural and physical aspects of heat treated wood, part 1: softwood

Michiel J Boonstra, JF Rijsdijk, C Sander, Edo V Kegel, B Tjeerdsma, Holger Militz, Joris Van Acker UGent and Marc Stevens UGent (2006) MADERAS. CIENCIA Y TECNOLOGIA. 8(3). p.193-208
abstract
Heat treatment of wood is an effective method to improve the dimensional stability and durability against biodegradation. Optimisation of a two-stage heat treatment process at relatively mild conditions (<200°C) and its effect on the anatomical structure of softwoods were investigated by means of a light and scanning electron microscopic analysis. Heat treatment did have an effect on the anatomical structure of wood, although this depends on the wood species considered and on the process method and conditions used. Softwood species with narrow annual rings and/or an abrupt transition from earlywood into latewood were sensitive to tangential cracks in the latewood section. Radial cracks occurred mainly in impermeable wood species such as Norway spruce, caused by large stresses in the wood structure during treatment. Sapwood of treated pine species revealed some damage to parenchyma cells in the rays and epithelial cells around resin canals, whereas this phenomenon has not been noticed in the heartwood section. Treated radiata pine resulted in a very open and permeable wood structure limiting the applications of this species. Broken cell walls perpendicular to the fibre direction resulting in transverse ruptures have been noticed in treated softwood species. This contributes to abrupt fractures of treated wood as observed in bending tests which can lead to considerably different failure behavior after impact or mechanical stress. In some treated softwood species maceration (small cracks between tracheids) was noticed after heat treatment. Heat treatment did not cause damage to the ray parenchyma pit membranes, bordered pits and large window pit membranes; the margo fibrils appeared without damage. Compared to the other softwood timbers tested European grown Douglas fir was the timber that stands heat treatment the best.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Wood modification, softwood, heat treatment, microscopy
journal title
MADERAS. CIENCIA Y TECNOLOGIA
Maderas, Cienc. Tecnol.
volume
8
issue
3
pages
193 - 208
ISSN
0718-221X
DOI
10.4067/S0718-221X2006000300006
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A2
additional info
very heavy file (37.9 Mb)!
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
852638
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-852638
alternative location
http://www.scielo.cl/pdf/maderas/v8n3/art06.pdf
date created
2010-02-05 10:41:54
date last changed
2010-02-16 09:57:03
@article{852638,
  abstract     = {Heat treatment of wood is an effective method to improve the dimensional stability and durability against biodegradation. Optimisation of a two-stage heat treatment process at relatively mild conditions ({\textlangle}200{\textdegree}C) and its effect on the anatomical structure of softwoods were investigated by means of a light and scanning electron microscopic analysis. Heat treatment did have an effect on the anatomical structure of wood, although this depends on the wood species considered and on the process method and conditions used. Softwood species with narrow annual rings and/or an abrupt transition from earlywood into latewood were sensitive to tangential cracks in the latewood section. Radial cracks occurred mainly in impermeable wood species such as Norway spruce, caused by large stresses in the wood structure during treatment. Sapwood of treated pine species revealed some damage to parenchyma cells in the rays and epithelial cells around resin canals, whereas this phenomenon has not been noticed in the heartwood section. Treated radiata pine resulted in a very open and permeable wood structure limiting the applications of this species. Broken cell walls perpendicular to the fibre direction resulting in transverse ruptures have been noticed in treated softwood species. This contributes to abrupt fractures of treated wood as observed in bending tests which can lead to considerably different failure behavior after impact or mechanical stress. In some treated softwood species maceration (small cracks between tracheids) was noticed after heat treatment. Heat treatment did not cause damage to the ray parenchyma pit membranes, bordered pits and large window pit membranes; the margo fibrils appeared without damage. Compared to the other softwood timbers tested European grown Douglas fir was the timber that stands heat treatment the best.},
  author       = {Boonstra, Michiel J and Rijsdijk, JF and Sander, C and Kegel, Edo V and Tjeerdsma, B and Militz, Holger and Van Acker, Joris and Stevens, Marc},
  issn         = {0718-221X},
  journal      = {MADERAS. CIENCIA Y TECNOLOGIA},
  keyword      = {Wood modification,softwood,heat treatment,microscopy},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {193--208},
  title        = {Microstructural and physical aspects of heat treated wood, part 1: softwood},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4067/S0718-221X2006000300006},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2006},
}

Chicago
Boonstra, Michiel J, JF Rijsdijk, C Sander, Edo V Kegel, B Tjeerdsma, Holger Militz, Joris Van Acker, and Marc Stevens. 2006. “Microstructural and Physical Aspects of Heat Treated Wood, Part 1: Softwood.” Maderas. Ciencia Y Tecnologia 8 (3): 193–208.
APA
Boonstra, Michiel J, Rijsdijk, J., Sander, C., Kegel, E. V., Tjeerdsma, B., Militz, H., Van Acker, J., et al. (2006). Microstructural and physical aspects of heat treated wood, part 1: softwood. MADERAS. CIENCIA Y TECNOLOGIA, 8(3), 193–208.
Vancouver
1.
Boonstra MJ, Rijsdijk J, Sander C, Kegel EV, Tjeerdsma B, Militz H, et al. Microstructural and physical aspects of heat treated wood, part 1: softwood. MADERAS. CIENCIA Y TECNOLOGIA. 2006;8(3):193–208.
MLA
Boonstra, Michiel J, JF Rijsdijk, C Sander, et al. “Microstructural and Physical Aspects of Heat Treated Wood, Part 1: Softwood.” MADERAS. CIENCIA Y TECNOLOGIA 8.3 (2006): 193–208. Print.