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Impact of the freeze-drying process on product appearance, residual moisture content, viability, and batch uniformity of freeze-dried bacterial cultures safeguarded at culture collections

Jindrich Peiren (UGent) , Ann Hellemans (UGent) and Paul De Vos (UGent)
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Abstract
In this study, causes of collapsed bacterial cultures in glass ampoules observed after freeze-drying were investigated as well as the influence of collapse on residual moisture content (RMC) and viability. Also, the effect of heat radiation and post freeze-drying treatments on the RMC was studied. Cake morphologies of 21 bacterial strains obtained after freeze-drying with one standard protocol could be classified visually into four major types: no collapse, porous, partial collapse, and collapse. The more pronounced the collapse, the higher residual moisture content of the freeze-dried product, ranging from 1.53 % for non-collapsed products to 3.62 % for collapsed products. The most important cause of collapse was the mass of the inserted cotton plug in the ampoule. Default cotton plugs with a mass between 21 and 30 mg inside the ampoule did not affect the viability of freeze-dried Aliivibrio fischeri LMG 4414(T) compared to ampoules without cotton plugs. Cotton plugs with a mass higher than 65 mg inside the ampoule induced a full collapsed product with rubbery look (melt-back) and decreasing viability during storage. Heat radiation effects in the freeze-drying chamber and post freeze-drying treatments such as exposure time to air after freeze-drying and manifold drying time prior to heat sealing of ampoules influenced the RMC of freeze-dried products. To produce uniform batches of freeze-dried bacterial strains with intact cake structures and highest viabilities, inserted cotton plugs should not exceed 21 mg per ampoule. Furthermore, heat radiation effects should be calculated in the design of the primary drying phase and manifold drying time before heat sealing should be determined as a function of exposure time to air.
Keywords
DELBRUECKII SSP BULGARICUS, LACTIC-ACID BACTERIA, LACTOBACILLUS-RHAMNOSUS, REHYDRATION MEDIA, STORAGE STABILITY, PROTECTIVE AGENTS, GROWTH MEDIA, GLASSY STATE, SURVIVAL, PRESERVATION, Freeze-drying, Bacteria, Collapse, Residual moisture content, Ampoule, Viability, Biological resource center

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Peiren, Jindrich, Ann Hellemans, and Paul De Vos. 2016. “Impact of the Freeze-drying Process on Product Appearance, Residual Moisture Content, Viability, and Batch Uniformity of Freeze-dried Bacterial Cultures Safeguarded at Culture Collections.” Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology 100 (14): 6239–6249.
APA
Peiren, J., Hellemans, A., & De Vos, P. (2016). Impact of the freeze-drying process on product appearance, residual moisture content, viability, and batch uniformity of freeze-dried bacterial cultures safeguarded at culture collections. APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY, 100(14), 6239–6249.
Vancouver
1.
Peiren J, Hellemans A, De Vos P. Impact of the freeze-drying process on product appearance, residual moisture content, viability, and batch uniformity of freeze-dried bacterial cultures safeguarded at culture collections. APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY. 2016;100(14):6239–49.
MLA
Peiren, Jindrich, Ann Hellemans, and Paul De Vos. “Impact of the Freeze-drying Process on Product Appearance, Residual Moisture Content, Viability, and Batch Uniformity of Freeze-dried Bacterial Cultures Safeguarded at Culture Collections.” APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY 100.14 (2016): 6239–6249. Print.
@article{8526018,
  abstract     = {In this study, causes of collapsed bacterial cultures in glass ampoules observed after freeze-drying were investigated as well as the influence of collapse on residual moisture content (RMC) and viability. Also, the effect of heat radiation and post freeze-drying treatments on the RMC was studied. Cake morphologies of 21 bacterial strains obtained after freeze-drying with one standard protocol could be classified visually into four major types: no collapse, porous, partial collapse, and collapse. The more pronounced the collapse, the higher residual moisture content of the freeze-dried product, ranging from 1.53 \% for non-collapsed products to 3.62 \% for collapsed products. The most important cause of collapse was the mass of the inserted cotton plug in the ampoule. Default cotton plugs with a mass between 21 and 30 mg inside the ampoule did not affect the viability of freeze-dried Aliivibrio fischeri LMG 4414(T) compared to ampoules without cotton plugs. Cotton plugs with a mass higher than 65 mg inside the ampoule induced a full collapsed product with rubbery look (melt-back) and decreasing viability during storage. Heat radiation effects in the freeze-drying chamber and post freeze-drying treatments such as exposure time to air after freeze-drying and manifold drying time prior to heat sealing of ampoules influenced the RMC of freeze-dried products. To produce uniform batches of freeze-dried bacterial strains with intact cake structures and highest viabilities, inserted cotton plugs should not exceed 21 mg per ampoule. Furthermore, heat radiation effects should be calculated in the design of the primary drying phase and manifold drying time before heat sealing should be determined as a function of exposure time to air.},
  author       = {Peiren, Jindrich and Hellemans, Ann and De Vos, Paul},
  issn         = {0175-7598},
  journal      = {APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {14},
  pages        = {6239--6249},
  title        = {Impact of the freeze-drying process on product appearance, residual moisture content, viability, and batch uniformity of freeze-dried bacterial cultures safeguarded at culture collections},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-016-7359-1},
  volume       = {100},
  year         = {2016},
}

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