Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

BRDF and its impact on aerial archaeological photography

Geert Verhoeven UGent (2017) ARCHAEOLOGICAL PROSPECTION . 24(2). p.133-140
abstract
Despite the arguments in favour of oblique photographs acquired during observer-directed reconnaissance sorties, many aerial archaeologists have extracted much valuable information from verticals generated during total coverage mapping surveys. This paper looks at one of these arguments: the issue of anisotropic surface reflectance, which is responsible for the allegedly superior rendering of (mainly) vegetation and shadow marks when observed from certain oblique viewpoints. However, after a theoretical and practical assessment of the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of vegetation, it becomes clear that nadir views provide a more than satisfying alternative to the extremes of an oblique approach.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Aerial archaeology, Aerial photography, Airborne remote sensing, BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function), Oblique aerial photography, Remote sensing, Vertical photography
journal title
ARCHAEOLOGICAL PROSPECTION
volume
24
issue
2
pages
8 pages
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN
1075-2196
DOI
10.1002/arp.1559
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
8525303
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8525303
date created
2017-06-27 09:15:28
date last changed
2017-06-28 07:44:14
@article{8525303,
  abstract     = {Despite the arguments in favour of oblique photographs acquired during observer-directed reconnaissance sorties, many aerial archaeologists have extracted much valuable information from verticals generated during total coverage mapping surveys. This paper looks at one of these arguments: the issue of anisotropic surface reflectance, which is responsible for the allegedly superior rendering of (mainly) vegetation and shadow marks when observed from certain oblique viewpoints. However, after a theoretical and practical assessment of the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of vegetation, it becomes clear that nadir views provide a more than satisfying alternative to the extremes of an oblique approach.},
  author       = {Verhoeven, Geert},
  issn         = {1075-2196},
  journal      = {ARCHAEOLOGICAL PROSPECTION                            },
  keyword      = {Aerial archaeology,Aerial photography,Airborne remote sensing,BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function),Oblique aerial photography,Remote sensing,Vertical photography},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {133--140},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  title        = {BRDF and its impact on aerial archaeological photography},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/arp.1559},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2017},
}

Chicago
Verhoeven, Geert. 2017. “BRDF and Its Impact on Aerial Archaeological Photography.” Archaeological Prospection  24 (2): 133–140.
APA
Verhoeven, G. (2017). BRDF and its impact on aerial archaeological photography. ARCHAEOLOGICAL PROSPECTION  , 24(2), 133–140.
Vancouver
1.
Verhoeven G. BRDF and its impact on aerial archaeological photography. ARCHAEOLOGICAL PROSPECTION  . Wiley-Blackwell; 2017;24(2):133–40.
MLA
Verhoeven, Geert. “BRDF and Its Impact on Aerial Archaeological Photography.” ARCHAEOLOGICAL PROSPECTION  24.2 (2017): 133–140. Print.