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Perceived group threat, perceived injustice, and self-reported right-wing violence : an integrative approach to the explanation right-wing violence

Lieven Pauwels (UGent) and Ben Heylen (UGent)
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Abstract
The present study aims at explaining individual differences in self-reported political violence. We integrate key concepts from the field of criminology that are conceptually related to social identity theory (Flemish identity, feelings of group superiority, and ethnocentrism) and the dual process model on prejudice (perceived injustice, perception of threat, and right-wing authoritarianism). In our model, social identity concepts are hypothesized to play a mediating role between mechanisms derived from the dual process model and political violence. To test the integrated model, a model was run for testing the strength of direct and indirect effects of perceived injustice, authoritarianism thrill-seeking behavior, feelings of superiority, Flemish nationalism, ethnocentrism, right-wing extremist beliefs, and exposure to racist peers on political violence. The analyses are based on a web survey (N = 723) among adolescents and young adults in Flanders, Belgium. Results indicate that social identity variables play an important mediation role between perceptions and ideological attitudes related to injustice, and political violence. The main path revealed by our study is that perceived injustice may result in heightened perceptions of threat, which in turn positively influence levels of right-wing authoritarianism. Mediated by ethnocentrism, this variable has a significant and positive effect on right-wing beliefs, which in turn has a positive effect on political violence.
Keywords
perceived injustice, right-wing authoritarianism, thrill-seeking behavior, extremist beliefs, political violence

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MLA
Pauwels, Lieven, and Ben Heylen. “Perceived Group Threat, Perceived Injustice, and Self-Reported Right-Wing Violence : An Integrative Approach to the Explanation Right-Wing Violence.” JOURNAL OF INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE, 2020.
APA
Pauwels, L., & Heylen, B. (2020). Perceived group threat, perceived injustice, and self-reported right-wing violence : an integrative approach to the explanation right-wing violence. JOURNAL OF INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE.
Chicago author-date
Pauwels, Lieven, and Ben Heylen. 2020. “Perceived Group Threat, Perceived Injustice, and Self-Reported Right-Wing Violence : An Integrative Approach to the Explanation Right-Wing Violence.” JOURNAL OF INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Pauwels, Lieven, and Ben Heylen. 2020. “Perceived Group Threat, Perceived Injustice, and Self-Reported Right-Wing Violence : An Integrative Approach to the Explanation Right-Wing Violence.” JOURNAL OF INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE.
Vancouver
1.
Pauwels L, Heylen B. Perceived group threat, perceived injustice, and self-reported right-wing violence : an integrative approach to the explanation right-wing violence. JOURNAL OF INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE. 2020;
IEEE
[1]
L. Pauwels and B. Heylen, “Perceived group threat, perceived injustice, and self-reported right-wing violence : an integrative approach to the explanation right-wing violence,” JOURNAL OF INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE, 2020.
@article{8524059,
  abstract     = {The present study aims at explaining individual differences in self-reported political violence. We integrate key concepts from the field of criminology that are conceptually related to social identity theory (Flemish identity, feelings of group superiority, and ethnocentrism) and the dual process model on prejudice (perceived injustice, perception of threat, and right-wing authoritarianism). In our model, social identity concepts are hypothesized to play a mediating role between mechanisms derived from the dual process model and political violence. To test the integrated model, a model was run for testing the strength of direct and indirect effects of perceived injustice, authoritarianism thrill-seeking behavior, feelings of superiority, Flemish nationalism, ethnocentrism, right-wing extremist beliefs, and exposure to racist peers on political violence. The analyses are based on a web survey (N = 723) among adolescents and young adults in Flanders, Belgium. Results indicate that social identity variables play an important mediation role between perceptions and ideological attitudes related to injustice, and political violence. The main path revealed by our study is that perceived injustice may result in heightened perceptions of threat, which in turn positively influence levels of right-wing authoritarianism. Mediated by ethnocentrism, this variable has a significant and positive effect on right-wing beliefs, which in turn has a positive effect on political violence.},
  author       = {Pauwels, Lieven and Heylen, Ben},
  issn         = {0886-2605},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE},
  keywords     = {perceived injustice,right-wing authoritarianism,thrill-seeking behavior,extremist beliefs,political violence},
  language     = {eng},
  title        = {Perceived group threat, perceived injustice, and self-reported right-wing violence : an integrative approach to the explanation right-wing violence},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0886260517713711},
  year         = {2020},
}

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