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Reading and listening progress in segregated primary schools : does ethnic and socioeconomic classroom composition matter?

Lisa Dewulf (UGent) , Johan van Braak (UGent) and Mieke Van Houtte (UGent)
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Abstract
This study aimed to investigate the relationship of classroom composition factors with reading and listening comprehension achievement and progress in socially and ethnically segregated primary schools in Flanders (Belgium). Specifically, using a three-level multivariate repeated measures analysis, it examined the association of reading and listening achievement and progress with ethnic diversity, the proportion of non-native students and the average socioeconomic status of the class, taking into account student characteristics. At the beginning and end of the school year, reading tests, listening tests and questionnaires were administered to a sample of 7- and 8-year-old students (n = 683) in 42 second-grade classes. Students' listening comprehension achievement at the beginning of the school year was negatively related to having a home language other than the language of instruction and to classes with a high proportion of non-native students. However, progress in listening comprehension was not significantly associated with any student or classroom composition factors. Students whose mothers had a lower level of education performed lower on reading comprehension at the beginning of the school year, while at the end of the school year students whose mothers had a higher level of education were at a greater disadvantage. Limitations of this study and directions for future research are discussed.
Keywords
school segregation, classroom composition, reading progress, listening progress, TEACHER EXPECTATIONS, STUDENT OUTCOMES, ACHIEVEMENT, COMPREHENSION, INSTRUCTION

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MLA
Dewulf, Lisa, et al. “Reading and Listening Progress in Segregated Primary Schools : Does Ethnic and Socioeconomic Classroom Composition Matter?” BRITISH EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH JOURNAL, vol. 43, no. 5, 2017, pp. 931–51.
APA
Dewulf, L., van Braak, J., & Van Houtte, M. (2017). Reading and listening progress in segregated primary schools : does ethnic and socioeconomic classroom composition matter? BRITISH EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH JOURNAL, 43(5), 931–951.
Chicago author-date
Dewulf, Lisa, Johan van Braak, and Mieke Van Houtte. 2017. “Reading and Listening Progress in Segregated Primary Schools : Does Ethnic and Socioeconomic Classroom Composition Matter?” BRITISH EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH JOURNAL 43 (5): 931–51.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Dewulf, Lisa, Johan van Braak, and Mieke Van Houtte. 2017. “Reading and Listening Progress in Segregated Primary Schools : Does Ethnic and Socioeconomic Classroom Composition Matter?” BRITISH EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH JOURNAL 43 (5): 931–951.
Vancouver
1.
Dewulf L, van Braak J, Van Houtte M. Reading and listening progress in segregated primary schools : does ethnic and socioeconomic classroom composition matter? BRITISH EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH JOURNAL. 2017;43(5):931–51.
IEEE
[1]
L. Dewulf, J. van Braak, and M. Van Houtte, “Reading and listening progress in segregated primary schools : does ethnic and socioeconomic classroom composition matter?,” BRITISH EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH JOURNAL, vol. 43, no. 5, pp. 931–951, 2017.
@article{8522540,
  abstract     = {{This study aimed to investigate the relationship of classroom composition factors with reading and listening comprehension achievement and progress in socially and ethnically segregated primary schools in Flanders (Belgium). Specifically, using a three-level multivariate repeated measures analysis, it examined the association of reading and listening achievement and progress with ethnic diversity, the proportion of non-native students and the average socioeconomic status of the class, taking into account student characteristics. At the beginning and end of the school year, reading tests, listening tests and questionnaires were administered to a sample of 7- and 8-year-old students (n = 683) in 42 second-grade classes. Students' listening comprehension achievement at the beginning of the school year was negatively related to having a home language other than the language of instruction and to classes with a high proportion of non-native students. However, progress in listening comprehension was not significantly associated with any student or classroom composition factors. Students whose mothers had a lower level of education performed lower on reading comprehension at the beginning of the school year, while at the end of the school year students whose mothers had a higher level of education were at a greater disadvantage. Limitations of this study and directions for future research are discussed.}},
  author       = {{Dewulf, Lisa and van Braak, Johan and Van Houtte, Mieke}},
  issn         = {{0141-1926}},
  journal      = {{BRITISH EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH JOURNAL}},
  keywords     = {{school segregation,classroom composition,reading progress,listening progress,TEACHER EXPECTATIONS,STUDENT OUTCOMES,ACHIEVEMENT,COMPREHENSION,INSTRUCTION}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{5}},
  pages        = {{931--951}},
  title        = {{Reading and listening progress in segregated primary schools : does ethnic and socioeconomic classroom composition matter?}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/berj.3292}},
  volume       = {{43}},
  year         = {{2017}},
}

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