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The future of evapotranspiration : global requirements for ecosystem functioning, carbon and climate feedbacks, agricultural management, and water resources

(2017) WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH. 53(4). p.2618-2626
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Abstract
The fate of the terrestrial biosphere is highly uncertain given recent and projected changes in climate. This is especially acute for impacts associated with changes in drought frequency and intensity on the distribution and timing of water availability. The development of effective adaptation strategies for these emerging threats to food and water security are compromised by limitations in our understanding of how natural and managed ecosystems are responding to changing hydrological and climatological regimes. This information gap is exacerbated by insufficient monitoring capabilities from local to global scales. Here, we describe how evapotranspiration (ET) represents the key variable in linking ecosystem functioning, carbon and climate feedbacks, agricultural management, and water resources, and highlight both the outstanding science and applications questions and the actions, especially from a space-based perspective, necessary to advance them.
Keywords
SUBMARINE GROUNDWATER DISCHARGE, NORTH CHINA PLAIN, SEA-LEVEL RISE, AQUIFER, SUSTAINABILITY, QUALITY, ESTUARY, OCEAN, INTERFACE, INTRUSION, coastal hydrogeology, seawater intrusion, submarine groundwater, discharge, science and society

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MLA
Fisher, Joshua B et al. “The Future of Evapotranspiration : Global Requirements for Ecosystem Functioning, Carbon and Climate Feedbacks, Agricultural Management, and Water Resources.” WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH 2017 : 2618–2626. Print.
APA
Fisher, J. B., Melton, F., Middleton, E., Hain, C., Anderson, M., Allen, R., McCabe, M. F., et al. (2017). The future of evapotranspiration : global requirements for ecosystem functioning, carbon and climate feedbacks, agricultural management, and water resources. WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH.
Chicago author-date
Fisher, Joshua B, Forrest Melton, Elizabeth Middleton, Christopher Hain, Martha Anderson, Richard Allen, Matthew F McCabe, et al. 2017. “The Future of Evapotranspiration : Global Requirements for Ecosystem Functioning, Carbon and Climate Feedbacks, Agricultural Management, and Water Resources.” Water Resources Research.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Fisher, Joshua B, Forrest Melton, Elizabeth Middleton, Christopher Hain, Martha Anderson, Richard Allen, Matthew F McCabe, Simon Hook, Dennis Baldocchi, Philip A Townsend, Ayse Kilic, Kevin Tu, Diego Gonzalez Miralles, Johan Perret, Jean-Pierre Lagouarde, Duane Waliser, Adam J Purdy, Andrew French, David Schimel, James S Famiglietti, Graeme Stephens, and Eric F Wood. 2017. “The Future of Evapotranspiration : Global Requirements for Ecosystem Functioning, Carbon and Climate Feedbacks, Agricultural Management, and Water Resources.” Water Resources Research.
Vancouver
1.
Fisher JB, Melton F, Middleton E, Hain C, Anderson M, Allen R, et al. The future of evapotranspiration : global requirements for ecosystem functioning, carbon and climate feedbacks, agricultural management, and water resources. WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH. 2017. p. 2618–26.
IEEE
[1]
J. B. Fisher et al., “The future of evapotranspiration : global requirements for ecosystem functioning, carbon and climate feedbacks, agricultural management, and water resources,” WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, vol. 53, no. 4. pp. 2618–2626, 2017.
@misc{8522500,
  abstract     = {The fate of the terrestrial biosphere is highly uncertain given recent and projected changes in climate. This is especially acute for impacts associated with changes in drought frequency and intensity on the distribution and timing of water availability. The development of effective adaptation strategies for these emerging threats to food and water security are compromised by limitations in our understanding of how natural and managed ecosystems are responding to changing hydrological and climatological regimes. This information gap is exacerbated by insufficient monitoring capabilities from local to global scales. Here, we describe how evapotranspiration (ET) represents the key variable in linking ecosystem functioning, carbon and climate feedbacks, agricultural management, and water resources, and highlight both the outstanding science and applications questions and the actions, especially from a space-based perspective, necessary to advance them.},
  author       = {Fisher, Joshua B and Melton, Forrest and Middleton, Elizabeth and Hain, Christopher and Anderson, Martha and Allen, Richard and McCabe, Matthew F and Hook, Simon and Baldocchi, Dennis and Townsend, Philip A and Kilic, Ayse and Tu, Kevin and Gonzalez Miralles, Diego and Perret, Johan and Lagouarde, Jean-Pierre and Waliser, Duane and Purdy, Adam J and French, Andrew and Schimel, David and Famiglietti, James S and Stephens, Graeme and Wood, Eric F},
  issn         = {0043-1397},
  keywords     = {SUBMARINE GROUNDWATER DISCHARGE,NORTH CHINA PLAIN,SEA-LEVEL RISE,AQUIFER,SUSTAINABILITY,QUALITY,ESTUARY,OCEAN,INTERFACE,INTRUSION,coastal hydrogeology,seawater intrusion,submarine groundwater,discharge,science and society},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {2618--2626},
  series       = {WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH},
  title        = {The future of evapotranspiration : global requirements for ecosystem functioning, carbon and climate feedbacks, agricultural management, and water resources},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2016WR020175},
  volume       = {53},
  year         = {2017},
}

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