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The influence of motion artefacts on magnetic resonance imaging of the clavicles for age estimation

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Abstract
Purpose: To determine the influence of motion artefacts on developmental stage allocation to the sternal end of both clavicles on MRI. Materials and methods: Eighteen healthy Caucasian volunteers between 14 and 30 years of age were prospectively included. One rest state scan and five intentional motion scans were conducted using 3T MRI. For every motion scan a rest state matched control scan was included, based on the developmental stages of the clavicles (Kreitner 1998). Since in every motion participant one rest state scan was conducted, an additional 72 rest state scans were selected from the study sample of Hillewig et al. (2013) and from an ongoing study at our institute. Six observers interpreted the anonymised images individually. Afterwards a consensus stage was allocated. Results: Although rest state scans were more often assessable than motion scans (71% versus 43%, P < 0.001), rest state scans were not more often correctly classified (55% versus 63%, P = 0.55). Moreover, reproducibility of staging was found to be unacceptably low, even based on rest state scans (Krippendorff’s α = 0.21). Discussion: The low inter-observer agreement could be explained by (1) breathing artefacts impeding staging even in rest state scans and (2) confusing stages I and IV, which occurred in both rest state scans and motion scans. Restricting developmental classification of the clavicles to a two-stage system (i.e. unfused vs. fully fused) might enhance reproducibility. Conclusion: Evaluating clavicle development on MRI for forensic age estimation should be based on a restricted number of stages in order to be reliable.
Keywords
Magnetic resonance imaging, Age estimation, Motion artefacts, Clavicle

Citation

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MLA
De Tobel, Jannick, Mayonne van Wijk, Elke Hillewig, et al. “The Influence of Motion Artefacts on Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Clavicles for Age Estimation.” Society of Forensic Radiology and Imaging, 6th International Congress, Abstracts. 2017. 64–64. Print.
APA
De Tobel, J., van Wijk, M., Hillewig, E., Phlypo, I., Alberink, I., van Rijn, R., Thevissen, P., et al. (2017). The influence of motion artefacts on magnetic resonance imaging of the clavicles for age estimation. Society of Forensic Radiology and Imaging, 6th International congress, Abstracts (pp. 64–64). Presented at the 6th International Society of Forensic Radiology and Imaging (ISFRI) congress.
Chicago author-date
De Tobel, Jannick, Mayonne van Wijk, Elke Hillewig, Inès Phlypo, Ivo Alberink, Rick van Rijn, Patrick Thevissen, Koenraad Verstraete, and Michiel de Haas. 2017. “The Influence of Motion Artefacts on Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Clavicles for Age Estimation.” In Society of Forensic Radiology and Imaging, 6th International Congress, Abstracts, 64–64.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
De Tobel, Jannick, Mayonne van Wijk, Elke Hillewig, Inès Phlypo, Ivo Alberink, Rick van Rijn, Patrick Thevissen, Koenraad Verstraete, and Michiel de Haas. 2017. “The Influence of Motion Artefacts on Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Clavicles for Age Estimation.” In Society of Forensic Radiology and Imaging, 6th International Congress, Abstracts, 64–64.
Vancouver
1.
De Tobel J, van Wijk M, Hillewig E, Phlypo I, Alberink I, van Rijn R, et al. The influence of motion artefacts on magnetic resonance imaging of the clavicles for age estimation. Society of Forensic Radiology and Imaging, 6th International congress, Abstracts. 2017. p. 64–64.
IEEE
[1]
J. De Tobel et al., “The influence of motion artefacts on magnetic resonance imaging of the clavicles for age estimation,” in Society of Forensic Radiology and Imaging, 6th International congress, Abstracts, Odense, Denmark, 2017, pp. 64–64.
@inproceedings{8521797,
  abstract     = {Purpose: To determine the influence of motion artefacts on developmental stage allocation to the sternal end of both clavicles on MRI.
Materials and methods: Eighteen healthy Caucasian volunteers between 14 and 30 years of age were prospectively included. One rest state scan and five intentional motion scans were conducted using 3T MRI. For every motion scan a rest state matched control scan was included, based on the developmental stages of the clavicles (Kreitner 1998). Since in every motion participant one rest state scan was conducted, an additional 72 rest state scans were selected from the study sample of Hillewig et al. (2013) and from an ongoing study at our institute. Six observers interpreted the anonymised images individually. Afterwards a consensus stage was allocated.
Results: Although rest state scans were more often assessable than motion scans (71% versus 43%, P < 0.001), rest state scans were not more often correctly classified (55% versus 63%, P = 0.55). Moreover, reproducibility of staging was found to be unacceptably low, even based on rest state scans (Krippendorff’s α = 0.21).
Discussion: The low inter-observer agreement could be explained by (1) breathing artefacts impeding staging even in rest state scans and (2) confusing stages I and IV, which occurred in both rest state scans and motion scans. Restricting developmental classification of the clavicles to a two-stage system (i.e. unfused vs. fully fused) might enhance reproducibility.
Conclusion: Evaluating clavicle development on MRI for forensic age estimation should be based on a restricted number of stages in order to be reliable.},
  author       = {De Tobel, Jannick and van Wijk, Mayonne and Hillewig, Elke and Phlypo, Inès and Alberink, Ivo and van Rijn, Rick and Thevissen, Patrick and Verstraete, Koenraad and de Haas, Michiel},
  booktitle    = {Society of Forensic Radiology and Imaging, 6th International congress, Abstracts},
  keywords     = {Magnetic resonance imaging,Age estimation,Motion artefacts,Clavicle},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Odense, Denmark},
  pages        = {64--64},
  title        = {The influence of motion artefacts on magnetic resonance imaging of the clavicles for age estimation},
  year         = {2017},
}