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Autonomy and social functioning of recently admitted nursing home residents

(2017) AGING & MENTAL HEALTH. 21(9). p.910-916
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Abstract
Objectives: This paper examines recently admitted nursing home residents' practical autonomy, their remaining social environment and their social functioning. Method: In a cross-sectional design, 391 newly admitted residents of 67 nursing homes participated. All respondents were 65years old, had mini-mental state examination 18 and were living in the nursing home for at least 1 month. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire and validated measuring tools. Results: The mean age was 84, 64% were female, 23% had a partner, 80% children, 75% grandchildren and 59% siblings. The mean social functioning score was 3/9 (or 33%) and the autonomy and importance of autonomy score 6/9 (or 67%). More autonomy was observed when residents could perform activities of daily living more independently, and cognitive functioning, quality of life and social functioning were high. Residents with depressive feelings scored lower on autonomy and social functioning compared to those without depressive feelings. Having siblings and the frequency of visits positively correlated with social functioning. In turn, social functioning correlated positively with quality of life. Moreover, a higher score on social functioning lowered the probability of depression. Conclusion: Autonomy or self-determination and maintaining remaining social relationships were considered to be important by the new residents. The remaining social environment, social functioning, quality of life, autonomy and depressive feelings influenced each other, but the cause--effect relation was not clear.
Keywords
Autonomy, social functioning, quality of life, depressive feelings, QUALITY-OF-LIFE, OLDER-ADULTS, CARE, TRANSITION, LONELINESS

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Paque, Kristel et al. “Autonomy and Social Functioning of Recently Admitted Nursing Home Residents.” AGING & MENTAL HEALTH 21.9 (2017): 910–916. Print.
APA
Paque, K., Goossens, K., Elseviers, M., Van Bogaert, P., & Dilles, T. (2017). Autonomy and social functioning of recently admitted nursing home residents. AGING & MENTAL HEALTH, 21(9), 910–916.
Chicago author-date
Paque, Kristel, Katrien Goossens, Monique Elseviers, Peter Van Bogaert, and Tinne Dilles. 2017. “Autonomy and Social Functioning of Recently Admitted Nursing Home Residents.” Aging & Mental Health 21 (9): 910–916.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Paque, Kristel, Katrien Goossens, Monique Elseviers, Peter Van Bogaert, and Tinne Dilles. 2017. “Autonomy and Social Functioning of Recently Admitted Nursing Home Residents.” Aging & Mental Health 21 (9): 910–916.
Vancouver
1.
Paque K, Goossens K, Elseviers M, Van Bogaert P, Dilles T. Autonomy and social functioning of recently admitted nursing home residents. AGING & MENTAL HEALTH. 2017;21(9):910–6.
IEEE
[1]
K. Paque, K. Goossens, M. Elseviers, P. Van Bogaert, and T. Dilles, “Autonomy and social functioning of recently admitted nursing home residents,” AGING & MENTAL HEALTH, vol. 21, no. 9, pp. 910–916, 2017.
@article{8521766,
  abstract     = {Objectives: This paper examines recently admitted nursing home residents' practical autonomy, their remaining social environment and their social functioning.
Method: In a cross-sectional design, 391 newly admitted residents of 67 nursing homes participated. All respondents were 65years old, had mini-mental state examination 18 and were living in the nursing home for at least 1 month. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire and validated measuring tools.
Results: The mean age was 84, 64% were female, 23% had a partner, 80% children, 75% grandchildren and 59% siblings. The mean social functioning score was 3/9 (or 33%) and the autonomy and importance of autonomy score 6/9 (or 67%). More autonomy was observed when residents could perform activities of daily living more independently, and cognitive functioning, quality of life and social functioning were high. Residents with depressive feelings scored lower on autonomy and social functioning compared to those without depressive feelings. Having siblings and the frequency of visits positively correlated with social functioning. In turn, social functioning correlated positively with quality of life. Moreover, a higher score on social functioning lowered the probability of depression.
Conclusion: Autonomy or self-determination and maintaining remaining social relationships were considered to be important by the new residents. The remaining social environment, social functioning, quality of life, autonomy and depressive feelings influenced each other, but the cause--effect relation was not clear.},
  author       = {Paque, Kristel and Goossens, Katrien and Elseviers, Monique and Van Bogaert, Peter and Dilles, Tinne},
  issn         = {1360-7863},
  journal      = {AGING & MENTAL HEALTH},
  keywords     = {Autonomy,social functioning,quality of life,depressive feelings,QUALITY-OF-LIFE,OLDER-ADULTS,CARE,TRANSITION,LONELINESS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {910--916},
  title        = {Autonomy and social functioning of recently admitted nursing home residents},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13607863.2016.1181711},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2017},
}

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