Advanced search
2 files | 1.21 MB

Four-element ultrawideband textile cross array for dual-spatial and dual-polarization diversity

Thijs Castel (UGent) , Sam Lemey (UGent) , Patrick Van Torre (UGent) , Claude Oestges and Hendrik Rogier (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
The emergence of miniaturized flexible electronics enables on-duty first responders to collect biometrical and environmental data through multiple on-body sensors, integrated into their clothing. However, gathering these life-saving data would be useless if they cannot set up reliable, preferable high-data-rate, wireless communication links between the sensors and a remote base station. Therefore, we have developed a four-element ultrawideband textile cross array that combines dual-spatial and dual-polarization diversity and is easily deployable in a first responder's garment. The impedance bandwidth of the array equals 1.43 GHz, while mutual coupling between its elements remains below -25 dB. For a maximal bit error rate of 1e-4, the array realizes a diversity gain of 24.81 dB. When applying adaptive subcarrier modulation, the mean throughput per orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) subcarrier increases by an extra bit/symbol when comparing fourth- to second-order diversity.
Keywords
IBCN

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 851.24 KB
  • 6892 i.pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 363.44 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Castel, Thijs, Sam Lemey, Patrick Van Torre, Claude Oestges, and Hendrik Rogier. 2017. “Four-element Ultrawideband Textile Cross Array for Dual-spatial and Dual-polarization Diversity.” Ieee Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters 16: 481–484.
APA
Castel, T., Lemey, S., Van Torre, P., Oestges, C., & Rogier, H. (2017). Four-element ultrawideband textile cross array for dual-spatial and dual-polarization diversity. IEEE ANTENNAS AND WIRELESS PROPAGATION LETTERS, 16, 481–484.
Vancouver
1.
Castel T, Lemey S, Van Torre P, Oestges C, Rogier H. Four-element ultrawideband textile cross array for dual-spatial and dual-polarization diversity. IEEE ANTENNAS AND WIRELESS PROPAGATION LETTERS. 2017;16:481–4.
MLA
Castel, Thijs, Sam Lemey, Patrick Van Torre, et al. “Four-element Ultrawideband Textile Cross Array for Dual-spatial and Dual-polarization Diversity.” IEEE ANTENNAS AND WIRELESS PROPAGATION LETTERS 16 (2017): 481–484. Print.
@article{8521242,
  abstract     = {The emergence of miniaturized flexible electronics enables on-duty first responders to collect biometrical and environmental data through multiple on-body sensors, integrated into their clothing. However, gathering these life-saving data would be useless if they cannot set up reliable, preferable high-data-rate, wireless communication links between the sensors and a remote base station. Therefore, we have developed a four-element ultrawideband textile cross array that combines dual-spatial and dual-polarization diversity and is easily deployable in a first responder's garment. The impedance bandwidth of the array equals 1.43 GHz, while mutual coupling between its elements remains below -25 dB. For a maximal bit error rate of 1e-4, the array realizes a diversity gain of 24.81 dB. When applying adaptive subcarrier modulation, the mean throughput per orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) subcarrier increases by an extra bit/symbol when comparing fourth- to second-order diversity.},
  author       = {Castel, Thijs and Lemey, Sam and Van Torre, Patrick and Oestges, Claude and Rogier, Hendrik},
  issn         = {1536-1225},
  journal      = {IEEE ANTENNAS AND WIRELESS PROPAGATION LETTERS},
  keyword      = {IBCN},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {481--484},
  title        = {Four-element ultrawideband textile cross array for dual-spatial and dual-polarization diversity},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/LAWP.2016.2585308},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2017},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: