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Mucosa-associated biohydrogenating microbes protect the simulated colon microbiome from stress associated with high concentrations of poly-unsaturated fat

Rosemarie De Weirdt, Emma Hernandez Sanabria UGent, Veerle Fievez UGent, Eva Mees, Annelies Geirnaert, Florence Van Herreweghen UGent, Ramiro Vilchez Vargas, Pieter Van den Abbeele, Ruy Jauregui, Dietmar H Pieper, et al. (2017) ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY. 19(2). p.722-739
abstract
Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) may affect colon microbiome homeostasis by exerting (specific) antimicrobial effects and/or interfering with mucosal biofilm formation at the gut mucosal interface. We used standardized batch incubations and the Mucosal-Simulator of the Human Microbial Intestinal Ecosystem (M-SHIME) to show the in vitro luminal and mucosal effects of the main PUFA in the Western diet, linoleic acid (LA). High concentrations of LA were found to decrease butyrate production and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii numbers dependent on LA biohydrogenation to vaccenic acid (VA) and stearic acid (SA). In faecal batch incubations, LA biohydrogenation and butyrate production were positively correlated and SA did not inhibit butyrate production. In the M-SHIME, addition of a mucosal environment stimulated biohydrogenation to SA and protected F. prausnitzii from inhibition by LA. This was probably due to the preference of two biohydrogenating genera Roseburia and Pseudobutyrivibrio for the mucosal niche. Co-culture batch incubations using Roseburia hominis and F. prausnitzii validated these observations. Correlations networks further uncovered the central role of Roseburia and Pseudobutyrivibrio in protecting luminal and mucosal SHIME microbiota from LA-induced stress. Our results confirm how cross-shielding interactions provide resilience to the microbiome and demonstrate the importance of biohydrogenating, mucosal bacteria for recovery from LA stress.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
CONJUGATED LINOLEIC-ACID, INFLAMMATORY-BOWEL-DISEASE, FAECALIBACTERIUM-PRAUSNITZII, RIBOSOMAL-RNA, GASTROINTESTINAL-TRACT, BACTERIAL COMMUNITY, GUT MICROBIOTA, VACCENIC ACID, OAT GRAIN, METABOLISM
journal title
ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY
Environ. Microbiol.
volume
19
issue
2
pages
722 - 739
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000394973000029
ISSN
1462-2912
1462-2920
DOI
10.1111/1462-2920.13622
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
8521106
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8521106
date created
2017-05-22 14:12:49
date last changed
2017-06-09 10:00:51
@article{8521106,
  abstract     = {Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) may affect colon microbiome homeostasis by exerting (specific) antimicrobial effects and/or interfering with mucosal biofilm formation at the gut mucosal interface. We used standardized batch incubations and the Mucosal-Simulator of the Human Microbial Intestinal Ecosystem (M-SHIME) to show the in vitro luminal and mucosal effects of the main PUFA in the Western diet, linoleic acid (LA). High concentrations of LA were found to decrease butyrate production and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii numbers dependent on LA biohydrogenation to vaccenic acid (VA) and stearic acid (SA). In faecal batch incubations, LA biohydrogenation and butyrate production were positively correlated and SA did not inhibit butyrate production. In the M-SHIME, addition of a mucosal environment stimulated biohydrogenation to SA and protected F. prausnitzii from inhibition by LA. This was probably due to the preference of two biohydrogenating genera Roseburia and Pseudobutyrivibrio for the mucosal niche. Co-culture batch incubations using Roseburia hominis and F. prausnitzii validated these observations. Correlations networks further uncovered the central role of Roseburia and Pseudobutyrivibrio in protecting luminal and mucosal SHIME microbiota from LA-induced stress. Our results confirm how cross-shielding interactions provide resilience to the microbiome and demonstrate the importance of biohydrogenating, mucosal bacteria for recovery from LA stress.},
  author       = {De Weirdt, Rosemarie and Hernandez Sanabria, Emma and Fievez, Veerle and Mees, Eva and Geirnaert, Annelies and Van Herreweghen, Florence and Vilchez Vargas, Ramiro and Van den Abbeele, Pieter and Jauregui, Ruy and Pieper, Dietmar H and Vlaeminck, Bruno and Van de Wiele, Tom},
  issn         = {1462-2912},
  journal      = {ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {CONJUGATED LINOLEIC-ACID,INFLAMMATORY-BOWEL-DISEASE,FAECALIBACTERIUM-PRAUSNITZII,RIBOSOMAL-RNA,GASTROINTESTINAL-TRACT,BACTERIAL COMMUNITY,GUT MICROBIOTA,VACCENIC ACID,OAT GRAIN,METABOLISM},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {722--739},
  title        = {Mucosa-associated biohydrogenating microbes protect the simulated colon microbiome from stress associated with high concentrations of poly-unsaturated fat},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.13622},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2017},
}

Chicago
De Weirdt, Rosemarie, Emma Hernandez Sanabria, Veerle Fievez, Eva Mees, Annelies Geirnaert, Florence Van Herreweghen, Ramiro Vilchez Vargas, et al. 2017. “Mucosa-associated Biohydrogenating Microbes Protect the Simulated Colon Microbiome from Stress Associated with High Concentrations of Poly-unsaturated Fat.” Environmental Microbiology 19 (2): 722–739.
APA
De Weirdt, R., Hernandez Sanabria, E., Fievez, V., Mees, E., Geirnaert, A., Van Herreweghen, F., Vilchez Vargas, R., et al. (2017). Mucosa-associated biohydrogenating microbes protect the simulated colon microbiome from stress associated with high concentrations of poly-unsaturated fat. ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 19(2), 722–739.
Vancouver
1.
De Weirdt R, Hernandez Sanabria E, Fievez V, Mees E, Geirnaert A, Van Herreweghen F, et al. Mucosa-associated biohydrogenating microbes protect the simulated colon microbiome from stress associated with high concentrations of poly-unsaturated fat. ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY. 2017;19(2):722–39.
MLA
De Weirdt, Rosemarie, Emma Hernandez Sanabria, Veerle Fievez, et al. “Mucosa-associated Biohydrogenating Microbes Protect the Simulated Colon Microbiome from Stress Associated with High Concentrations of Poly-unsaturated Fat.” ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY 19.2 (2017): 722–739. Print.