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Temperature sensitivity of carbon decomposition in soil aggregates along a climatic gradient

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Abstract
Global warming affects the carbon (C) pools in terrestrial ecosystems, accelerating biological processes that feed back into the phenomenon of climate change. Globally, grassland ecosystems accumulate large quantities of organic C into soils and are considered a corner stone for global warming mitigation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the temperature sensitivity of C decomposition in different soil aggregate fractions in grassland ecosystems across a north-south latitudinal gradient in Chile. Soil samples were collected from Mediterranean semi-arid (MSA; 32 degrees 31' to 34 degrees 19' south latitude), temperate semi-oceanic (TSO; 35 degrees 36' to 36 degrees 27' south latitude), temperate oceanic (TO; 40 degrees 36' to 43 degrees 03' south latitude) and subpolar semi-oceanic (SPSO; 43 degrees 57' to 47 degrees 40' south latitude) climate zones, and water-stable macroaggregates (250-2,000 mu m) and free microaggregates (50-250 mu m) were isolated. Two experiments were performed using short-term incubations (14 days). First, absolute soil respiration and specific soil respiration from isolated aggregates were assessed at 20 degrees C, and second, the isolated aggregates were incubated at different temperature levels (20-30 degrees C for MSA and TSO; 10-20 degrees C for TO and SPSO) to quantify the energy of activation (E-a) and temperature sensitivity (Q(10)). In general, the results do not provide evidence of differences between soil aggregate fractions in any of the evaluated parameters, but the soils differed across the latitudinal gradient. High absolute respiration rates and specific respiration, which were related to high grassland productivity, were observed in soils from TO and SPSO zones. The Q(10) values demonstrated a strong positive correlation with annual precipitation, so C decomposition in soils from zones with high precipitation exhibits increased temperature sensitivity.
Keywords
ORGANIC-MATTER, STABILIZATION, SEQUESTRATION, MECHANISMS, NITROGEN, STORAGE, Energy of activation, Q(10), Arrhenius equation, grassland ecosystems, soil fractionation

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Citation

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Chicago
Muñoz, C, B Cruz, F Rojo, J Campos, M Casanova, Sebastian Doetterl, Pascal Boeckx, and E Zagal. 2016. “Temperature Sensitivity of Carbon Decomposition in Soil Aggregates Along a Climatic Gradient.” Journal of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition 16 (2): 461–476.
APA
Muñoz, C., Cruz, B., Rojo, F., Campos, J., Casanova, M., Doetterl, S., Boeckx, P., et al. (2016). Temperature sensitivity of carbon decomposition in soil aggregates along a climatic gradient. JOURNAL OF SOIL SCIENCE AND PLANT NUTRITION, 16(2), 461–476.
Vancouver
1.
Muñoz C, Cruz B, Rojo F, Campos J, Casanova M, Doetterl S, et al. Temperature sensitivity of carbon decomposition in soil aggregates along a climatic gradient. JOURNAL OF SOIL SCIENCE AND PLANT NUTRITION. 2016;16(2):461–76.
MLA
Muñoz, C, B Cruz, F Rojo, et al. “Temperature Sensitivity of Carbon Decomposition in Soil Aggregates Along a Climatic Gradient.” JOURNAL OF SOIL SCIENCE AND PLANT NUTRITION 16.2 (2016): 461–476. Print.
@article{8520880,
  abstract     = {Global warming affects the carbon (C) pools in terrestrial ecosystems, accelerating biological processes that feed back into the phenomenon of climate change. Globally, grassland ecosystems accumulate large quantities of organic C into soils and are considered a corner stone for global warming mitigation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the temperature sensitivity of C decomposition in different soil aggregate fractions in grassland ecosystems across a north-south latitudinal gradient in Chile. Soil samples were collected from Mediterranean semi-arid (MSA; 32 degrees 31' to 34 degrees 19' south latitude), temperate semi-oceanic (TSO; 35 degrees 36' to 36 degrees 27' south latitude), temperate oceanic (TO; 40 degrees 36' to 43 degrees 03' south latitude) and subpolar semi-oceanic (SPSO; 43 degrees 57' to 47 degrees 40' south latitude) climate zones, and water-stable macroaggregates (250-2,000 mu m) and free microaggregates (50-250 mu m) were isolated. Two experiments were performed using short-term incubations (14 days). First, absolute soil respiration and specific soil respiration from isolated aggregates were assessed at 20 degrees C, and second, the isolated aggregates were incubated at different temperature levels (20-30 degrees C for MSA and TSO; 10-20 degrees C for TO and SPSO) to quantify the energy of activation (E-a) and temperature sensitivity (Q(10)). In general, the results do not provide evidence of differences between soil aggregate fractions in any of the evaluated parameters, but the soils differed across the latitudinal gradient. High absolute respiration rates and specific respiration, which were related to high grassland productivity, were observed in soils from TO and SPSO zones. The Q(10) values demonstrated a strong positive correlation with annual precipitation, so C decomposition in soils from zones with high precipitation exhibits increased temperature sensitivity.},
  author       = {Mu{\~n}oz, C and Cruz, B and Rojo, F and Campos, J and Casanova, M and Doetterl, Sebastian and Boeckx, Pascal and Zagal, E},
  issn         = {0718-9516},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF SOIL SCIENCE AND PLANT NUTRITION},
  keyword      = {ORGANIC-MATTER,STABILIZATION,SEQUESTRATION,MECHANISMS,NITROGEN,STORAGE,Energy of activation,Q(10),Arrhenius equation,grassland ecosystems,soil fractionation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {461--476},
  title        = {Temperature sensitivity of carbon decomposition in soil aggregates along a climatic gradient},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2016},
}

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