Advanced search
1 file | 1.18 MB

Influence of non-ionic surfactant type on the salt sensitivity of oregano oil-in-water emulsions

Ali Sedaghat Doost (UGent) , Davy Sinnaeve (UGent) , Lorenz De Neve (UGent) and Paul Van Der Meeren (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
During the last decade, there has been a growing interest for more "label-friendly" ingredients in food industry, as well as in pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. Thus, a lot of research has been developed to the antimicrobial and/or antioxidant characteristics of essential oils. We, therefore, examined the influence of environmental stress conditions (i.e. salt addition and acidification) on the stability of oregano essential oil emulsions that were stabilized by either Tween 80 or Inutec SP1. Whereas Tween 80 is a non-ionic, food-grade ethoxylated sorbitan ester, Inutec SP1 is a biodegradable and renewable hydrophobically modified inulin. Whereas the emulsions prepared with Tween 80 exhibited phase separation (oiling off) at all salt concentrations studied, the emulsions stabilized with Inutec SP1 remained stable for several days; pH variation on the other hand exhibited no significant effect on the stability. Diffusion ordered spectroscopy measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance (DOSY NMR) as well as viscosity measurements suggested the dehydration of the polyoxyethylene (POE) head groups of Tween 80 upon NaCl addition. Measurements by a Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, on the other hand, presented no NaCl effect on the thickness of the adsorbed Tween 80 layer to a hydrophobic surface. Besides the effect of NaCl addition or pH variation, the influence of the ripening inhibitor concentration in the lipid phase and/or temperature variation on the Ostwald ripening levels were also investigated. Emulsions containing a 50:50 ratio of oregano essential oil to sunflower oil stored at 4 degrees C exhibited a significant reduction in Ostwald ripening rate. This study has implications for the development of essential oil emulsions to be used as antimicrobial agent when exposed to environmental stress conditions.
Keywords
Essential oil nanoemulsions, Tween 80, Inutec, Environmental stress, Diffusion coefficient, NANOEMULSION FORMATION, DIFFUSION, STABILITY, MARINADE, INULIN, MEAT, PH, ENCAPSULATION, DEGRADATION, PERFORMANCE

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 1.18 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Sedaghat Doost, Ali, Davy Sinnaeve, Lorenz De Neve, and Paul Van Der Meeren. 2017. “Influence of Non-ionic Surfactant Type on the Salt Sensitivity of Oregano Oil-in-water Emulsions.” Colloids and Surfaces A-physicochemical and Engineering Aspects 525: 38–48.
APA
Sedaghat Doost, A., Sinnaeve, D., De Neve, L., & Van Der Meeren, P. (2017). Influence of non-ionic surfactant type on the salt sensitivity of oregano oil-in-water emulsions. COLLOIDS AND SURFACES A-PHYSICOCHEMICAL AND ENGINEERING ASPECTS, 525, 38–48.
Vancouver
1.
Sedaghat Doost A, Sinnaeve D, De Neve L, Van Der Meeren P. Influence of non-ionic surfactant type on the salt sensitivity of oregano oil-in-water emulsions. COLLOIDS AND SURFACES A-PHYSICOCHEMICAL AND ENGINEERING ASPECTS. 2017;525:38–48.
MLA
Sedaghat Doost, Ali, Davy Sinnaeve, Lorenz De Neve, et al. “Influence of Non-ionic Surfactant Type on the Salt Sensitivity of Oregano Oil-in-water Emulsions.” COLLOIDS AND SURFACES A-PHYSICOCHEMICAL AND ENGINEERING ASPECTS 525 (2017): 38–48. Print.
@article{8520402,
  abstract     = {During the last decade, there has been a growing interest for more {\textacutedbl}label-friendly{\textacutedbl} ingredients in food industry, as well as in pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. Thus, a lot of research has been developed to the antimicrobial and/or antioxidant characteristics of essential oils. We, therefore, examined the influence of environmental stress conditions (i.e. salt addition and acidification) on the stability of oregano essential oil emulsions that were stabilized by either Tween 80 or Inutec SP1. Whereas Tween 80 is a non-ionic, food-grade ethoxylated sorbitan ester, Inutec SP1 is a biodegradable and renewable hydrophobically modified inulin. Whereas the emulsions prepared with Tween 80 exhibited phase separation (oiling off) at all salt concentrations studied, the emulsions stabilized with Inutec SP1 remained stable for several days; pH variation on the other hand exhibited no significant effect on the stability. Diffusion ordered spectroscopy measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance (DOSY NMR) as well as viscosity measurements suggested the dehydration of the polyoxyethylene (POE) head groups of Tween 80 upon NaCl addition. Measurements by a Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, on the other hand, presented no NaCl effect on the thickness of the adsorbed Tween 80 layer to a hydrophobic surface. Besides the effect of NaCl addition or pH variation, the influence of the ripening inhibitor concentration in the lipid phase and/or temperature variation on the Ostwald ripening levels were also investigated. Emulsions containing a 50:50 ratio of oregano essential oil to sunflower oil stored at 4 degrees C exhibited a significant reduction in Ostwald ripening rate. This study has implications for the development of essential oil emulsions to be used as antimicrobial agent when exposed to environmental stress conditions.},
  author       = {Sedaghat Doost, Ali and Sinnaeve, Davy and De Neve, Lorenz and Van Der Meeren, Paul},
  issn         = {0927-7757},
  journal      = {COLLOIDS AND SURFACES A-PHYSICOCHEMICAL AND ENGINEERING ASPECTS},
  keyword      = {Essential oil nanoemulsions,Tween 80,Inutec,Environmental stress,Diffusion coefficient,NANOEMULSION FORMATION,DIFFUSION,STABILITY,MARINADE,INULIN,MEAT,PH,ENCAPSULATION,DEGRADATION,PERFORMANCE},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {38--48},
  title        = {Influence of non-ionic surfactant type on the salt sensitivity of oregano oil-in-water emulsions},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.colsurfa.2017.04.066},
  volume       = {525},
  year         = {2017},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: