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mtCOI successfully diagnoses the four main plant-parasitic Aphelenchoides species (Nematoda: Aphelenchoididae) and supports a multiple origin of plant-parasitism in this paraphyletic genus

Alcides Sánchez-Monge, Toon Janssen (UGent) , Yiwu Fang (UGent) , Marjolein Couvreur (UGent) , Gerrit Karssen (UGent) and Wim Bert (UGent)
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Abstract
Composed mostly of fungivorous species, the genus Aphelenchoides also comprises 14 plant-parasitic species. The most common and devastating, A. besseyi, A. fragariae, A. ritzemabosi and A. subtenuis have been reported on more than 900 plant species. The combination of low inter-specific and high intra-specific morphological variability makes morphology-based identification extremely difficult within this genus, and has led to molecular tools being employed to ensure accurate diagnoses. rDNA markers are widely used for the identification of nematodes while the Cytochrome Oxidase I gene (COI) remains relatively unexplored despite its role as the standard barcode for almost all animal groups. To explore its suitability as a diagnostic tool, we studied a fragment of the mtCOI region of the four main plant-parasitic Aphelenchoides within a phylogenetic framework. We generated 69 mtCOI and 123 rDNA sequences of diverse Aphelenchoides taxa; 67 belong to the main plant-parasitic species including the first mtCOI sequence of A. fragariae and the first mtCOI and 28S sequences of A. subtenuis. mtCOI had a similar success rate for PCR amplification. Phylogenetic trees based on the three studied markers are largely in agreement with one another, validating their use for Aphelenchoides diagnosis; additionally, we were able to locate several misidentified sequences of plant-parasitic Aphelenchoides in existing databases. The concatenated analysis from the three markers resulted in a more robust insight into the phylogeny and evolution of Aphelenchoides, revealing that plant-parasitism has evolved independently at least three times within this genus, presumably from fungal-feeding ancestors.
Keywords
Concatenated analysis, Foliar nematodes, Molecular barcoding, Phylogeny, rDNA, PHYLOGENETIC-RELATIONSHIPS, MITOCHONDRIAL-DNA, SSU RDNA, EVOLUTION, BARCODES, TAXONOMY, PROPOSAL, FUNGI, TOOL, RNA

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Citation

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Chicago
Sánchez-Monge, Alcides, Toon Janssen, Yiwu Fang, Marjolein Couvreur, Gerrit Karssen, and Wim Bert. 2017. “mtCOI Successfully Diagnoses the Four Main Plant-parasitic Aphelenchoides Species (Nematoda: Aphelenchoididae) and Supports a Multiple Origin of Plant-parasitism in This Paraphyletic Genus.” European Journal of Plant Pathology 148 (4): 853–866.
APA
Sánchez-Monge, A., Janssen, T., Fang, Y., Couvreur, M., Karssen, G., & Bert, W. (2017). mtCOI successfully diagnoses the four main plant-parasitic Aphelenchoides species (Nematoda: Aphelenchoididae) and supports a multiple origin of plant-parasitism in this paraphyletic genus. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PLANT PATHOLOGY, 148(4), 853–866.
Vancouver
1.
Sánchez-Monge A, Janssen T, Fang Y, Couvreur M, Karssen G, Bert W. mtCOI successfully diagnoses the four main plant-parasitic Aphelenchoides species (Nematoda: Aphelenchoididae) and supports a multiple origin of plant-parasitism in this paraphyletic genus. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PLANT PATHOLOGY. 2017;148(4):853–66.
MLA
Sánchez-Monge, Alcides, Toon Janssen, Yiwu Fang, et al. “mtCOI Successfully Diagnoses the Four Main Plant-parasitic Aphelenchoides Species (Nematoda: Aphelenchoididae) and Supports a Multiple Origin of Plant-parasitism in This Paraphyletic Genus.” EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PLANT PATHOLOGY 148.4 (2017): 853–866. Print.
@article{8519576,
  abstract     = {Composed mostly of fungivorous species, the genus Aphelenchoides also comprises 14 plant-parasitic species. The most common and devastating, A. besseyi, A. fragariae, A. ritzemabosi and A. subtenuis have been reported on more than 900 plant species. The combination of low inter-specific and high intra-specific morphological variability makes morphology-based identification extremely difficult within this genus, and has led to molecular tools being employed to ensure accurate diagnoses. rDNA markers are widely used for the identification of nematodes while the Cytochrome Oxidase I gene (COI) remains relatively unexplored despite its role as the standard barcode for almost all animal groups. To explore its suitability as a diagnostic tool, we studied a fragment of the mtCOI region of the four main plant-parasitic Aphelenchoides within a phylogenetic framework. We generated 69 mtCOI and 123 rDNA sequences of diverse Aphelenchoides taxa; 67 belong to the main plant-parasitic species including the first mtCOI sequence of A. fragariae and the first mtCOI and 28S sequences of A. subtenuis. mtCOI had a similar success rate for PCR amplification. Phylogenetic trees based on the three studied markers are largely in agreement with one another, validating their use for Aphelenchoides diagnosis; additionally, we were able to locate several misidentified sequences of plant-parasitic Aphelenchoides in existing databases. The concatenated analysis from the three markers resulted in a more robust insight into the phylogeny and evolution of Aphelenchoides, revealing that plant-parasitism has evolved independently at least three times within this genus, presumably from fungal-feeding ancestors.},
  author       = {S{\'a}nchez-Monge, Alcides and Janssen, Toon and Fang, Yiwu and Couvreur, Marjolein and Karssen, Gerrit and Bert, Wim},
  issn         = {0929-1873},
  journal      = {EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PLANT PATHOLOGY},
  keyword      = {Concatenated analysis,Foliar nematodes,Molecular barcoding,Phylogeny,rDNA,PHYLOGENETIC-RELATIONSHIPS,MITOCHONDRIAL-DNA,SSU RDNA,EVOLUTION,BARCODES,TAXONOMY,PROPOSAL,FUNGI,TOOL,RNA},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {853--866},
  title        = {mtCOI successfully diagnoses the four main plant-parasitic Aphelenchoides species (Nematoda: Aphelenchoididae) and supports a multiple origin of plant-parasitism in this paraphyletic genus},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10658-016-1141-1},
  volume       = {148},
  year         = {2017},
}

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