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The influence of group membership on cross-contextual imitation

Oliver Genschow and Simon Schindler (2016) PSYCHONOMIC BULLETIN & REVIEW. 23(4). p.1257-1265
abstract
Research on mimicry has demonstrated that individuals imitate in-group members more strongly than out-group members. In the present study, we tested whether such top-down modulation also applies for more extreme forms of direct mapping, such as for cross-contextual imitation settings, in which individuals imitate others' movements without sharing a common goal or context. Models on self-other control suggest that top-down modulations are based merely on a direct link between social sensory processing and imitation. That is, perceived similarities between oneself and another person is sufficient to amplify a shared representation between own and others' actions, which then trigger imitation. However, motivational accounts explain such findings with the assumption that individuals are motivated to affiliate with others. Because imitation is linked to positive social consequences, individuals should imitate in-group members more strongly than out-group members. We tested these two theoretical accounts against each other by applying a cross-contextual imitation paradigm. The results demonstrate that in-group members are more strongly cross-contextually imitated than out-group members the higher individuals' motivation to affiliate with the in-group is. This supports motivational models but not self-other control accounts. Further theoretical implications are discussed.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
keyword
MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX, A-PRIORI LIKING, FACIAL EXPRESSIONS, SHARED, REPRESENTATIONS, BEHAVIORAL MIMICRY, SOCIAL-INTERACTION, EYE CONTACT, MOTOR, PERCEPTION, MOVEMENT, Imitation, Top-down modulation, Group influences
journal title
PSYCHONOMIC BULLETIN & REVIEW
Psychon. Bull. Rev.
volume
23
issue
4
pages
9 pages
publisher
Springer
place of publication
New york
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000381177500032
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY, EXPERIMENTAL
JCR impact factor
2.921 (2016)
JCR rank
19/84 (2016)
JCR quartile
1 (2016)
ISSN
1069-9384
DOI
10.3758/s13423-015-0983-4
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
8518884
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8518884
date created
2017-04-28 06:34:05
date last changed
2017-05-05 09:48:41
@article{8518884,
  abstract     = {Research on mimicry has demonstrated that individuals imitate in-group members more strongly than out-group members. In the present study, we tested whether such top-down modulation also applies for more extreme forms of direct mapping, such as for cross-contextual imitation settings, in which individuals imitate others' movements without sharing a common goal or context. Models on self-other control suggest that top-down modulations are based merely on a direct link between social sensory processing and imitation. That is, perceived similarities between oneself and another person is sufficient to amplify a shared representation between own and others' actions, which then trigger imitation. However, motivational accounts explain such findings with the assumption that individuals are motivated to affiliate with others. Because imitation is linked to positive social consequences, individuals should imitate in-group members more strongly than out-group members. We tested these two theoretical accounts against each other by applying a cross-contextual imitation paradigm. The results demonstrate that in-group members are more strongly cross-contextually imitated than out-group members the higher individuals' motivation to affiliate with the in-group is. This supports motivational models but not self-other control accounts. Further theoretical implications are discussed.},
  author       = {Genschow, Oliver and Schindler, Simon},
  issn         = {1069-9384},
  journal      = {PSYCHONOMIC BULLETIN \& REVIEW},
  keyword      = {MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX,A-PRIORI LIKING,FACIAL EXPRESSIONS,SHARED,REPRESENTATIONS,BEHAVIORAL MIMICRY,SOCIAL-INTERACTION,EYE CONTACT,MOTOR,PERCEPTION,MOVEMENT,Imitation,Top-down modulation,Group influences},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {1257--1265},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  title        = {The influence of group membership on cross-contextual imitation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13423-015-0983-4},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2016},
}

Chicago
Genschow, Oliver, and Simon Schindler. 2016. “The Influence of Group Membership on Cross-contextual Imitation.” Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 23 (4): 1257–1265.
APA
Genschow, O., & Schindler, S. (2016). The influence of group membership on cross-contextual imitation. PSYCHONOMIC BULLETIN & REVIEW, 23(4), 1257–1265.
Vancouver
1.
Genschow O, Schindler S. The influence of group membership on cross-contextual imitation. PSYCHONOMIC BULLETIN & REVIEW. New york: Springer; 2016;23(4):1257–65.
MLA
Genschow, Oliver, and Simon Schindler. “The Influence of Group Membership on Cross-contextual Imitation.” PSYCHONOMIC BULLETIN & REVIEW 23.4 (2016): 1257–1265. Print.