Advanced search
1 file | 116.61 KB

The impact of a teaching or singing career on the female vocal quality at the mean age of 67 years : a pilot study

Author
Organization
Abstract
Objectives. The purpose of this study was to measure the objective and subjective vocal quality in women aged between 60 and 75 years. Secondly, the impact of a teaching or singing career on the vocal quality was investigated by comparing the vocal quality of retired women with different careers. Study design. This is a case-control study. Methods. Seventy-three retired women between 60 and 75 years (mean age: 67 years, standard deviation: 4.49) participated in the study and were divided into three groups: women with a teaching career (n = 21), choir singers with a singing career (n = 12), and women with a non-vocal career (n = 40). All subjects underwent the same assessment protocol consisting of objective (aerodynamic, maximum performance, vocal range, acoustic measurements, and the Dysphonia Severity Index) and subjective (the Voice Handicap Index, auditory-perceptual evaluations by three listeners) voice measurements. Results. In all three groups, objective and perceptual voice analysis showed a mild dysphonia. No differences in the Dysphonia Severity Index were found between the three groups. The voices of choir singers with a singing career were perceived significantly less rough than voices of the women with a non-vocal career. Additionally, the lowest frequency of the frequency range was significantly lower in the retired teachers and choir singers than in the controls. Conclusion. The results of this study prudently suggest that a singing or a teaching career compared with a nonvocal career has a positive impact on the vocal frequency range, and that singing has a positive impact on the perceptual vocal quality of the older female voice.
Keywords
Teaching, Singing, Careers, Aging, Voice, DYSPHONIA SEVERITY INDEX, VOICE DISORDERS, NONSINGERS, SINGERS, PROFILES, TEACHERS, WOMEN

Downloads

    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 116.61 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
D’haeseleer, Evelien, Sofie Claeys, Kim Bettens, Laura Leemans, Anne-Sophie Van Calster, Nina Van Damme, Zoë Thijs, Julie Daelman, Clara Leyns, and Kristiane Van Lierde. 2017. “The Impact of a Teaching or Singing Career on the Female Vocal Quality at the Mean Age of 67 Years : a Pilot Study.” Journal of Voice 31 (4).
APA
D’haeseleer, E., Claeys, S., Bettens, K., Leemans, L., Van Calster, A.-S., Van Damme, N., Thijs, Z., et al. (2017). The impact of a teaching or singing career on the female vocal quality at the mean age of 67 years : a pilot study. JOURNAL OF VOICE, 31(4).
Vancouver
1.
D’haeseleer E, Claeys S, Bettens K, Leemans L, Van Calster A-S, Van Damme N, et al. The impact of a teaching or singing career on the female vocal quality at the mean age of 67 years : a pilot study. JOURNAL OF VOICE. 2017;31(4).
MLA
D’haeseleer, Evelien, Sofie Claeys, Kim Bettens, et al. “The Impact of a Teaching or Singing Career on the Female Vocal Quality at the Mean Age of 67 Years : a Pilot Study.” JOURNAL OF VOICE 31.4 (2017): n. pag. Print.
@article{8518059,
  abstract     = {Objectives. The purpose of this study was to measure the objective and subjective vocal quality in women aged between 60 and 75 years. Secondly, the impact of a teaching or singing career on the vocal quality was investigated by comparing the vocal quality of retired women with different careers. 
Study design. This is a case-control study. 
Methods. Seventy-three retired women between 60 and 75 years (mean age: 67 years, standard deviation: 4.49) participated in the study and were divided into three groups: women with a teaching career (n = 21), choir singers with a singing career (n = 12), and women with a non-vocal career (n = 40). All subjects underwent the same assessment protocol consisting of objective (aerodynamic, maximum performance, vocal range, acoustic measurements, and the Dysphonia Severity Index) and subjective (the Voice Handicap Index, auditory-perceptual evaluations by three listeners) voice measurements. 
Results. In all three groups, objective and perceptual voice analysis showed a mild dysphonia. No differences in the Dysphonia Severity Index were found between the three groups. The voices of choir singers with a singing career were perceived significantly less rough than voices of the women with a non-vocal career. Additionally, the lowest frequency of the frequency range was significantly lower in the retired teachers and choir singers than in the controls. 
Conclusion. The results of this study prudently suggest that a singing or a teaching career compared with a nonvocal career has a positive impact on the vocal frequency range, and that singing has a positive impact on the perceptual vocal quality of the older female voice.},
  articleno    = {516.e19},
  author       = {D'haeseleer, Evelien and Claeys, Sofie and Bettens, Kim and Leemans, Laura and Van Calster, Anne-Sophie and Van Damme, Nina and Thijs, Zo{\"e} and Daelman, Julie and Leyns, Clara and Van Lierde, Kristiane},
  issn         = {0892-1997},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF VOICE},
  keyword      = {Teaching,Singing,Careers,Aging,Voice,DYSPHONIA SEVERITY INDEX,VOICE DISORDERS,NONSINGERS,SINGERS,PROFILES,TEACHERS,WOMEN},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {8},
  title        = {The impact of a teaching or singing career on the female vocal quality at the mean age of 67 years : a pilot study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvoice.2016.12.016},
  volume       = {31},
  year         = {2017},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: