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Biohydrogenation of 22:6n-3 by Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus P18

Jeyamalar Jeyanathan UGent, Marlene Escobar Hernández, Robert John Wallace, Veerle Fievez UGent and Bruno Vlaeminck UGent (2016) BMC MICROBIOLOGY. 16.
abstract
Background: Rumen microbes metabolize 22:6n-3. However, pathways of 22:6n-3 biohydrogenation and ruminal microbes involved in this process are not known. In this study, we examine the ability of the well-known rumen biohydrogenating bacteria, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens D1 and Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus P18, to hydrogenate 22:6n-3. Results: Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens D1 failed to hydrogenate 22:6n-3 (0.5 to 32 mu g/mL) in growth medium containing autoclaved ruminal fluid that either had or had not been centrifuged. Growth of B. fibrisolvens was delayed at the higher 22:6n-3 concentrations; however, total volatile fatty acid production was not affected. Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus P18 hydrogenated 22:6n-3 in growth medium containing autoclaved ruminal fluid that either had or had not been centrifuged. Biohydrogenation only started when volatile fatty acid production or growth of B. proteoclasticus P18 had been initiated, which might suggest that growth or metabolic activity is a prerequisite for the metabolism of 22:6n-3. The amount of 22:6n-3 hydrogenated was quantitatively recovered in several intermediate products eluting on the gas chromatogram between 22:6n-3 and 22:0. Formation of neither 22:0 nor 22:6 conjugated fatty acids was observed during 22:6n-3 metabolism. Extensive metabolism was observed at lower initial concentrations of 22:6n-3 (5, 10 and 20 mu g/mL) whereas increasing concentrations of 22:6n-3 (40 and 80 mu g/mL) inhibited its metabolism. Stearic acid formation (18:0) from 18:2n-6 by B. proteoclasticus P18 was retarded, but not completely inhibited, in the presence of 22:6n-3 and this effect was dependent on 22:6n-3 concentration. Conclusions: For the first time, our study identified ruminal bacteria with the ability to hydrogenate 22:6n-3. The gradual appearance of intermediates indicates that biohydrogenation of 22:6n-3 by B. proteoclasticus P18 occurs by pathways of isomerization and hydrogenation resulting in a variety of unsaturated 22 carbon fatty acids. During the simultaneous presence of 18:2n-6 and 22:6n-3, B. proteoclasticus P18 initiated 22:6n-3 metabolism before converting 18:1 isomers into 18:0.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
22:6n-3, Biohydrogenation, Butyrivibrio, Rumen fluid, In vitro, VFA, UNSATURATED FATTY-ACIDS, FISH-OIL, LINOLEIC-ACID, RUMINAL BIOHYDROGENATION, PHYLOGENETIC POSITION, ANAEROBIC-BACTERIA, MASS-SPECTROMETRY, LIPID-METABOLISM, RUMEN, FIBRISOLVENS
journal title
BMC MICROBIOLOGY
BMC Microbiol.
volume
16
article number
104
pages
12 pages
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000378855900001
JCR category
MICROBIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
2.644 (2016)
JCR rank
59/124 (2016)
JCR quartile
2 (2016)
ISSN
1471-2180
DOI
10.1186/s12866-016-0720-9
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0)
id
8518041
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8518041
date created
2017-04-18 12:15:55
date last changed
2017-07-06 13:04:52
@article{8518041,
  abstract     = {Background: Rumen microbes metabolize 22:6n-3. However, pathways of 22:6n-3 biohydrogenation and ruminal microbes involved in this process are not known. In this study, we examine the ability of the well-known rumen biohydrogenating bacteria, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens D1 and Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus P18, to hydrogenate 22:6n-3. 
Results: Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens D1 failed to hydrogenate 22:6n-3 (0.5 to 32 mu g/mL) in growth medium containing autoclaved ruminal fluid that either had or had not been centrifuged. Growth of B. fibrisolvens was delayed at the higher 22:6n-3 concentrations; however, total volatile fatty acid production was not affected. Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus P18 hydrogenated 22:6n-3 in growth medium containing autoclaved ruminal fluid that either had or had not been centrifuged. Biohydrogenation only started when volatile fatty acid production or growth of B. proteoclasticus P18 had been initiated, which might suggest that growth or metabolic activity is a prerequisite for the metabolism of 22:6n-3. The amount of 22:6n-3 hydrogenated was quantitatively recovered in several intermediate products eluting on the gas chromatogram between 22:6n-3 and 22:0. Formation of neither 22:0 nor 22:6 conjugated fatty acids was observed during 22:6n-3 metabolism. Extensive metabolism was observed at lower initial concentrations of 22:6n-3 (5, 10 and 20 mu g/mL) whereas increasing concentrations of 22:6n-3 (40 and 80 mu g/mL) inhibited its metabolism. Stearic acid formation (18:0) from 18:2n-6 by B. proteoclasticus P18 was retarded, but not completely inhibited, in the presence of 22:6n-3 and this effect was dependent on 22:6n-3 concentration. 
Conclusions: For the first time, our study identified ruminal bacteria with the ability to hydrogenate 22:6n-3. The gradual appearance of intermediates indicates that biohydrogenation of 22:6n-3 by B. proteoclasticus P18 occurs by pathways of isomerization and hydrogenation resulting in a variety of unsaturated 22 carbon fatty acids. During the simultaneous presence of 18:2n-6 and 22:6n-3, B. proteoclasticus P18 initiated 22:6n-3 metabolism before converting 18:1 isomers into 18:0.},
  articleno    = {104},
  author       = {Jeyanathan, Jeyamalar and Escobar Hern{\'a}ndez, Marlene and Wallace, Robert John and Fievez, Veerle and Vlaeminck, Bruno},
  issn         = {1471-2180},
  journal      = {BMC MICROBIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {22:6n-3,Biohydrogenation,Butyrivibrio,Rumen fluid,In vitro,VFA,UNSATURATED FATTY-ACIDS,FISH-OIL,LINOLEIC-ACID,RUMINAL BIOHYDROGENATION,PHYLOGENETIC POSITION,ANAEROBIC-BACTERIA,MASS-SPECTROMETRY,LIPID-METABOLISM,RUMEN,FIBRISOLVENS},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {12},
  title        = {Biohydrogenation of 22:6n-3 by Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus P18},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12866-016-0720-9},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2016},
}

Chicago
Jeyanathan, Jeyamalar, Marlene Escobar Hernández, Robert John Wallace, Veerle Fievez, and Bruno Vlaeminck. 2016. “Biohydrogenation of 22:6n-3 by Butyrivibrio Proteoclasticus P18.” Bmc Microbiology 16.
APA
Jeyanathan, J., Escobar Hernández, M., Wallace, R. J., Fievez, V., & Vlaeminck, B. (2016). Biohydrogenation of 22:6n-3 by Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus P18. BMC MICROBIOLOGY, 16.
Vancouver
1.
Jeyanathan J, Escobar Hernández M, Wallace RJ, Fievez V, Vlaeminck B. Biohydrogenation of 22:6n-3 by Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus P18. BMC MICROBIOLOGY. 2016;16.
MLA
Jeyanathan, Jeyamalar, Marlene Escobar Hernández, Robert John Wallace, et al. “Biohydrogenation of 22:6n-3 by Butyrivibrio Proteoclasticus P18.” BMC MICROBIOLOGY 16 (2016): n. pag. Print.