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Effect of dietary components on the gut microbiota ofaquatic animals : a never-ending story?

(2016) AQUACULTURE NUTRITION. 22(2). p.219-282
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Abstract
It is well known that healthy gut microbiota is essential to promote host health and well-being. The intestinal microbiota of endothermic animals as well as fish are classified as autochthonous or indigenous, when they are able to colonize the host's epithelial surface or are associated with the microvilli, or as allochthonous or transient (associated with digesta or are present in the lumen). Furthermore, the gut microbiota of aquatic animals is more fluidic than that of terrestrial vertebrates and is highly sensitive to dietary changes. In fish, it is demonstrated that [a] dietary form (live feeds or pelleted diets), [b] dietary lipid (lipid levels, lipid sources and polyunsaturated fatty acids), [c] protein sources (soybean meal, krill meal and other meal products), [d] functional glycomic ingredients (chitin and cellulose), [e] nutraceuticals (probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics and immunostimulants), [f] antibiotics, [g] dietary iron and [h] chromic oxide affect the gut microbiota. Furthermore, some information is available on bacterial colonization of the gut enterocyte surface as a result of dietary manipulation which indicates that changes in indigenous microbial populations may have repercussion on secondary host-microbe interactions. The effect of dietary components on the gut microbiota is important to investigate, as the gastrointestinal tract has been suggested as one of the major routes of infection in fish. Possible interactions between dietary components and the protective microbiota colonizing the digestive tract are discussed.
Keywords
TROUT ONCORHYNCHUS-MYKISS, SALMON SALMO-SALAR, COD GADUS-MORHUA, LACTIC-ACID BACTERIA, GRADIENT GEL-ELECTROPHORESIS, SALVELINUS-ALPINUS, L., TILAPIA OREOCHROMIS-NILOTICUS, 16S RIBOSOMAL-RNA, CARPIO VAR. JIAN, EUROPEAN SEA BASS, antibiotics, aquatic animals, dietary components, intestine, microbiota

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Citation

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Chicago
Ringo, E, Z Zhou, JLG Vecino, S Wadsworth, J Romero, A Krogdahl, RE Olsen, et al. 2016. “Effect of Dietary Components on the Gut Microbiota Ofaquatic Animals : a Never-ending Story?” Aquaculture Nutrition 22 (2): 219–282.
APA
Ringo, E., Zhou, Z., Vecino, J., Wadsworth, S., Romero, J., Krogdahl, A., Olsen, R., et al. (2016). Effect of dietary components on the gut microbiota ofaquatic animals : a never-ending story? AQUACULTURE NUTRITION, 22(2), 219–282.
Vancouver
1.
Ringo E, Zhou Z, Vecino J, Wadsworth S, Romero J, Krogdahl A, et al. Effect of dietary components on the gut microbiota ofaquatic animals : a never-ending story? AQUACULTURE NUTRITION. 2016;22(2):219–82.
MLA
Ringo, E, Z Zhou, JLG Vecino, et al. “Effect of Dietary Components on the Gut Microbiota Ofaquatic Animals : a Never-ending Story?” AQUACULTURE NUTRITION 22.2 (2016): 219–282. Print.
@article{8517580,
  abstract     = {It is well known that healthy gut microbiota is essential to promote host health and well-being. The intestinal microbiota of endothermic animals as well as fish are classified as autochthonous or indigenous, when they are able to colonize the host's epithelial surface or are associated with the microvilli, or as allochthonous or transient (associated with digesta or are present in the lumen). Furthermore, the gut microbiota of aquatic animals is more fluidic than that of terrestrial vertebrates and is highly sensitive to dietary changes. In fish, it is demonstrated that [a] dietary form (live feeds or pelleted diets), [b] dietary lipid (lipid levels, lipid sources and polyunsaturated fatty acids), [c] protein sources (soybean meal, krill meal and other meal products), [d] functional glycomic ingredients (chitin and cellulose), [e] nutraceuticals (probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics and immunostimulants), [f] antibiotics, [g] dietary iron and [h] chromic oxide affect the gut microbiota. Furthermore, some information is available on bacterial colonization of the gut enterocyte surface as a result of dietary manipulation which indicates that changes in indigenous microbial populations may have repercussion on secondary host-microbe interactions. The effect of dietary components on the gut microbiota is important to investigate, as the gastrointestinal tract has been suggested as one of the major routes of infection in fish. Possible interactions between dietary components and the protective microbiota colonizing the digestive tract are discussed.},
  author       = {Ringo, E and Zhou, Z and Vecino, JLG and Wadsworth, S and Romero, J and Krogdahl, A and Olsen, RE and Dimitroglou, A and Foey, A and Davies, S and Owen, M and Lauzon, HL and Martinsen, LL and De Schryver, Peter and Bossier, Peter and Sperstad, S and Merrifield, DL},
  issn         = {1353-5773},
  journal      = {AQUACULTURE NUTRITION},
  keyword      = {TROUT ONCORHYNCHUS-MYKISS,SALMON SALMO-SALAR,COD GADUS-MORHUA,LACTIC-ACID BACTERIA,GRADIENT GEL-ELECTROPHORESIS,SALVELINUS-ALPINUS,L.,TILAPIA OREOCHROMIS-NILOTICUS,16S RIBOSOMAL-RNA,CARPIO VAR. JIAN,EUROPEAN SEA BASS,antibiotics,aquatic animals,dietary components,intestine,microbiota},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {219--282},
  title        = {Effect of dietary components on the gut microbiota ofaquatic animals : a never-ending story?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/anu.12346},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2016},
}

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