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Juniperus communis: victim of the combined action of climate warming and nitrogen deposition?

Kris Verheyen UGent, Sandy Adriaenssens UGent, Robert Gruwez UGent, I Michalczyk, L Ward, Yves Rosseel UGent, A Van den Broeck and D Garcia (2009) PLANT BIOLOGY. 11(suppl. 1). p.49-59
abstract
Research on the combined effects of climate change and nitrogen deposition on reproductive traits, and especially on the production of viable seeds, is still scarce despite their importance for population persistence and expansion. Hence, in this study we set out to investigate the direct and indirect effects of the above-mentioned global change drivers on seed viability in the coniferous shrub Juniperus communis L. In many parts of its European range, juniper is increasingly threatened, partly because of a lack of sexual reproduction. We hypothesised that this regeneration failure is partly due to poor seed viability. Using data from 39 populations throughout Europe, we were able to demonstrate that a strong, triangular-shaped relationship exists between the percentage of viable seeds produced and the percentage of juniper seedlings occurring in a population, which indicates that the species is indeed partly seed limited. Furthermore, based on an extended dataset of 42 populations, we found that seed viability was negatively affected by temperature, measured as mean annual growing degree-days, and nitrogen deposition (but not by drought). Suggestions are made about the processes behind the observed patterns, but more research is required. Nevertheless, our results do raise serious concerns for the conservation of juniper in light of the predicted rise in temperature and global nitrogen emissions. Furthermore, it is likely that similar patterns can also be observed for other species.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Drought, Europe, growing degree-days, Megastigmus bipunctatus, nitrogen deposition, seed limitation, structural equation modelling, MEDITERRANEAN MOUNTAIN, PLANT-POPULATIONS, BOREAL FOREST, SEED, CONSERVATION, RECRUITMENT, L., VEGETATION, DYNAMICS, GROWTH
journal title
PLANT BIOLOGY
Plant Biol.
volume
11
issue
suppl. 1
issue title
Plant Functioning in a Changing Global Environment
pages
49 - 59
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000270153300006
JCR category
PLANT SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
2.223 (2009)
JCR rank
44/172 (2009)
JCR quartile
2 (2009)
ISSN
1435-8603
DOI
10.1111/j.1438-8677.2009.00214.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
851715
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-851715
date created
2010-02-04 14:38:07
date last changed
2015-06-17 11:21:13
@article{851715,
  abstract     = {Research on the combined effects of climate change and nitrogen deposition on reproductive traits, and especially on the production of viable seeds, is still scarce despite their importance for population persistence and expansion. Hence, in this study we set out to investigate the direct and indirect effects of the above-mentioned global change drivers on seed viability in the coniferous shrub Juniperus communis L. In many parts of its European range, juniper is increasingly threatened, partly because of a lack of sexual reproduction. We hypothesised that this regeneration failure is partly due to poor seed viability. Using data from 39 populations throughout Europe, we were able to demonstrate that a strong, triangular-shaped relationship exists between the percentage of viable seeds produced and the percentage of juniper seedlings occurring in a population, which indicates that the species is indeed partly seed limited. Furthermore, based on an extended dataset of 42 populations, we found that seed viability was negatively affected by temperature, measured as mean annual growing degree-days, and nitrogen deposition (but not by drought). Suggestions are made about the processes behind the observed patterns, but more research is required. Nevertheless, our results do raise serious concerns for the conservation of juniper in light of the predicted rise in temperature and global nitrogen emissions. Furthermore, it is likely that similar patterns can also be observed for other species.},
  author       = {Verheyen, Kris and Adriaenssens, Sandy and Gruwez, Robert and Michalczyk, I and Ward, L and Rosseel, Yves and Van den Broeck, A and Garcia, D},
  issn         = {1435-8603},
  journal      = {PLANT BIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {Drought,Europe,growing degree-days,Megastigmus bipunctatus,nitrogen deposition,seed limitation,structural equation modelling,MEDITERRANEAN MOUNTAIN,PLANT-POPULATIONS,BOREAL FOREST,SEED,CONSERVATION,RECRUITMENT,L.,VEGETATION,DYNAMICS,GROWTH},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {suppl. 1},
  pages        = {49--59},
  title        = {Juniperus communis: victim of the combined action of climate warming and nitrogen deposition?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1438-8677.2009.00214.x},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Verheyen, Kris, Sandy Adriaenssens, Robert Gruwez, I Michalczyk, L Ward, Yves Rosseel, A Van den Broeck, and D Garcia. 2009. “Juniperus Communis: Victim of the Combined Action of Climate Warming and Nitrogen Deposition?” Plant Biology 11 (suppl. 1): 49–59.
APA
Verheyen, Kris, Adriaenssens, S., Gruwez, R., Michalczyk, I., Ward, L., Rosseel, Y., Van den Broeck, A., et al. (2009). Juniperus communis: victim of the combined action of climate warming and nitrogen deposition? PLANT BIOLOGY, 11(suppl. 1), 49–59.
Vancouver
1.
Verheyen K, Adriaenssens S, Gruwez R, Michalczyk I, Ward L, Rosseel Y, et al. Juniperus communis: victim of the combined action of climate warming and nitrogen deposition? PLANT BIOLOGY. 2009;11(suppl. 1):49–59.
MLA
Verheyen, Kris, Sandy Adriaenssens, Robert Gruwez, et al. “Juniperus Communis: Victim of the Combined Action of Climate Warming and Nitrogen Deposition?” PLANT BIOLOGY 11.suppl. 1 (2009): 49–59. Print.