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Exposing the third chromosome of Burkholderia cepacia complex strains as a virulence plasmid

K Agnoli, S Schwager, S Uehlinger, A Vergunst, DF Viteri, DT Nguyen, PA Sokol, Aurélien Carlier UGent and L Eberl (2011) MOLECULAR MICROBIOLOGY. 83(2). p.362-378
abstract
The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) consists of 17 closely related species of opportunistic bacterial pathogens, which are particularly problematic for cystic fibrosis patients and immunocompromised individuals. Bcc genomes consist of multiple replicons, and each strain sequenced to date has three chromosomes. In addition to genes thought to be essential for survival, each chromosome carries at least one rRNA operon. We isolated three mutants during a transposon mutagenesis screen that were non-pathogenic in a Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. It was demonstrated that these mutants had lost chromosome 3 (c3), and that the observed attenuation of virulence was a consequence of this. We constructed a c3 mini-replicon and used it to cure c3 from strains of several Bcc species by plasmid incompatibility, resulting in nine c3-null strains covering seven Bcc species. Phenotypic characterization of c3-null mutants revealed that they were attenuated in virulence in multiple infection hosts (rat, zebrafish, C. elegans, Galleria mellonella and Drosophila melanogaster), that they exhibited greatly diminished antifungal activity, and that c3 was required for d-xylose, fatty acid and pyrimidine utilization, as well as for exopolysaccharide production and proteolytic activity in some strains. In conclusion, we show that c3 is not an essential chromosomal element, rather a large plasmid that encodes virulence, secondary metabolism and other accessory functions in Bcc bacteria.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
PSEUDOMONAS-AERUGINOSA MUTANTS, CYSTIC-FIBROSIS PATIENTS, CAENORHABDITIS-ELEGANS, ESCHERICHIA-COLI, TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATOR, CENOCEPACIA, IDENTIFICATION, GENES, PLANT, HOST
journal title
MOLECULAR MICROBIOLOGY
Mol. Microbiol.
volume
83
issue
2
pages
362 - 378
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000298988600010
JCR category
MICROBIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
5.01 (2011)
JCR rank
19/111 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
0950-382X
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2958.2011.07937.x
language
English
UGent publication?
no
classification
A1
id
8517112
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8517112
date created
2017-04-06 07:49:25
date last changed
2017-08-01 14:23:43
@article{8517112,
  abstract     = {The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) consists of 17 closely related species of opportunistic bacterial pathogens, which are particularly problematic for cystic fibrosis patients and immunocompromised individuals. Bcc genomes consist of multiple replicons, and each strain sequenced to date has three chromosomes. In addition to genes thought to be essential for survival, each chromosome carries at least one rRNA operon. We isolated three mutants during a transposon mutagenesis screen that were non-pathogenic in a Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. It was demonstrated that these mutants had lost chromosome 3 (c3), and that the observed attenuation of virulence was a consequence of this. We constructed a c3 mini-replicon and used it to cure c3 from strains of several Bcc species by plasmid incompatibility, resulting in nine c3-null strains covering seven Bcc species. Phenotypic characterization of c3-null mutants revealed that they were attenuated in virulence in multiple infection hosts (rat, zebrafish, C. elegans, Galleria mellonella and Drosophila melanogaster), that they exhibited greatly diminished antifungal activity, and that c3 was required for d-xylose, fatty acid and pyrimidine utilization, as well as for exopolysaccharide production and proteolytic activity in some strains. In conclusion, we show that c3 is not an essential chromosomal element, rather a large plasmid that encodes virulence, secondary metabolism and other accessory functions in Bcc bacteria.},
  author       = {Agnoli, K and Schwager, S and Uehlinger, S and Vergunst, A and Viteri, DF and Nguyen, DT and Sokol, PA and Carlier, Aur{\'e}lien and Eberl, L},
  issn         = {0950-382X},
  journal      = {MOLECULAR MICROBIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {PSEUDOMONAS-AERUGINOSA MUTANTS,CYSTIC-FIBROSIS PATIENTS,CAENORHABDITIS-ELEGANS,ESCHERICHIA-COLI,TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATOR,CENOCEPACIA,IDENTIFICATION,GENES,PLANT,HOST},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {362--378},
  title        = {Exposing the third chromosome of Burkholderia cepacia complex strains as a virulence plasmid},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2958.2011.07937.x},
  volume       = {83},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Agnoli, K, S Schwager, S Uehlinger, A Vergunst, DF Viteri, DT Nguyen, PA Sokol, Aurélien Carlier, and L Eberl. 2011. “Exposing the Third Chromosome of Burkholderia Cepacia Complex Strains as a Virulence Plasmid.” Molecular Microbiology 83 (2): 362–378.
APA
Agnoli, K, Schwager, S., Uehlinger, S., Vergunst, A., Viteri, D., Nguyen, D., Sokol, P., et al. (2011). Exposing the third chromosome of Burkholderia cepacia complex strains as a virulence plasmid. MOLECULAR MICROBIOLOGY, 83(2), 362–378.
Vancouver
1.
Agnoli K, Schwager S, Uehlinger S, Vergunst A, Viteri D, Nguyen D, et al. Exposing the third chromosome of Burkholderia cepacia complex strains as a virulence plasmid. MOLECULAR MICROBIOLOGY. 2011;83(2):362–78.
MLA
Agnoli, K, S Schwager, S Uehlinger, et al. “Exposing the Third Chromosome of Burkholderia Cepacia Complex Strains as a Virulence Plasmid.” MOLECULAR MICROBIOLOGY 83.2 (2011): 362–378. Print.