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This is the message from a molecular biologist who was active for 40 years in the development of what is now called LSQUOtransgenic plantsRSQUO and LSQUOgenetically modified (GM) cropsRSQUO. After nearly 20 years of commercial growth of these GM crops, no danger to the health of humans or animals has ever been substantiated. Also, no danger to the environment has been reported. On the contrary, GM technology could become an essential tool to achieve sustainable intensive agriculture. Nevertheless, public opinion, thanks to long campaigns by lobby groups with no scientific basis to their arguments, has imposed a very complex regulatory framework. Particularly in Europe and in many developing countries, field trials, essential for the development of GM crops, have been made impossible. The idea that public opinion, without any facts to back it up, can decide which science is good and which science should be banned is a very slippery slope for democracy. It is high time that the OECD shone some light on the GMO debate.
Keywords
GMO, transgenic plants, biosafety regulation, sustainable agriculture, pro-poor agriculture

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Chicago
Van Montagu, Marc. 2016. “GM Crops : Not the Science but the Regulatory Policy Is the Problem.” In XXIX International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture : Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes (IHC2014) ; III International Genetically Modified Organisms in Horticulture Symposium: Past, Present and Future, ed. B Panis, TAK Hvoslef-Eide, R Drew, and V Lane, 1124:1–10. Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS).
APA
Van Montagu, M. (2016). GM crops : not the science but the regulatory policy is the problem. In B Panis, T. Hvoslef-Eide, R. Drew, & V. Lane (Eds.), XXIX International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture : sustaining lives, livelihoods and landscapes (IHC2014) ; III International Genetically Modified Organisms in Horticulture symposium: Past, present and future (Vol. 1124, pp. 1–10). Presented at the 29th International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture : sustaining lives, livelihoods and landscapes (IHC2014) ; 3rd International Genetically Modified Organisms in Horticulture symposium: Past, present and future, Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS).
Vancouver
1.
Van Montagu M. GM crops : not the science but the regulatory policy is the problem. In: Panis B, Hvoslef-Eide T, Drew R, Lane V, editors. XXIX International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture : sustaining lives, livelihoods and landscapes (IHC2014) ; III International Genetically Modified Organisms in Horticulture symposium: Past, present and future. Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS); 2016. p. 1–10.
MLA
Van Montagu, Marc. “GM Crops : Not the Science but the Regulatory Policy Is the Problem.” XXIX International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture : Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes (IHC2014) ; III International Genetically Modified Organisms in Horticulture Symposium: Past, Present and Future. Ed. B Panis et al. Vol. 1124. Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS), 2016. 1–10. Print.
@inproceedings{8516893,
  abstract     = {This is the message from a molecular biologist who was active for 40 years in the development of what is now called LSQUOtransgenic plantsRSQUO and LSQUOgenetically modified (GM) cropsRSQUO. After nearly 20 years of commercial growth of these GM crops, no danger to the health of humans or animals has ever been substantiated. Also, no danger to the environment has been reported. On the contrary, GM technology could become an essential tool to achieve sustainable intensive agriculture. Nevertheless, public opinion, thanks to long campaigns by lobby groups with no scientific basis to their arguments, has imposed a very complex regulatory framework. Particularly in Europe and in many developing countries, field trials, essential for the development of GM crops, have been made impossible. The idea that public opinion, without any facts to back it up, can decide which science is good and which science should be banned is a very slippery slope for democracy. It is high time that the OECD shone some light on the GMO debate.},
  author       = {Van Montagu, Marc},
  booktitle    = {XXIX International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture : sustaining lives, livelihoods and landscapes (IHC2014) ; III International Genetically Modified Organisms in Horticulture symposium: Past, present and future},
  editor       = {Panis, B and Hvoslef-Eide, TAK and Drew, R and Lane, V},
  isbn         = {9789462611283},
  issn         = {0567-7572},
  keyword      = {GMO,transgenic plants,biosafety regulation,sustainable agriculture,pro-poor agriculture},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Brisbane, QLD, Australia},
  pages        = {1--10},
  publisher    = {International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS)},
  title        = {GM crops : not the science but the regulatory policy is the problem},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.17660/actahortic.2016.1124.1},
  volume       = {1124},
  year         = {2016},
}

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