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Forest seed banks along an intensity gradient of ancient agriculture

Jan Plue, J-L Dupouey, Kris Verheyen UGent and Martin Hermy UGent (2009) SEED SCIENCE RESEARCH. 19(2). p.103-114
abstract
Recently, forest seed banks were proven to not only reflect former (decades-old) but also ancient (centuries-old) land use. Yet, as land-use intensity determines the magnitude of seed-bank changes in recent forests, this study aims to identify whether an ancient land-use gradient would also be reflected in the seed bank. On a forested 1600-year-old archaeological site, five different land-use intensities were mapped and sampled. Apart from seed density, species richness and composition, functional seed-bank types, defined by nine seed-bank-related plant traits, were related to the land-use intensity gradient. The land-use gradient from gardens to undisturbed sites was still clearly reflected in the soil seed bank. Six emergent functional seed-bank types, characterized by specific plant traits, changed significantly in abundance, parallel to the land-use gradient. In particular, dispersal agent (and related traits) proved an important explanatory trait of present (functional) seed-bank patterns. Poor dispersers (large and heavy seeds) were not found in the intensively used areas, contrary to animal-dispersed species. Wind-dispersers may have been inhibited in the extension of their distribution by recruitment bottlenecks (low seed production) and/or competitive exclusion. Additionally, the agricultural land-use probably introduced ruderal species into the seed bank of the most intensively used areas, yielding a simultaneous increase in vegetation-seed-bank dissimilarity with land-use intensity, eliminating present vegetation as a driver behind the differences over the seed-bank gradient. We conclude by arguing how coppice-with-standards management possibly maintained the seed-bank gradient.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
functional seed-bank types, coppice-with-standards management, Gallo-Roman agriculture, land use, seed-bank pattern, Verbascum thapsus, DECIDUOUS FOREST, LAND-USE, OLD-FIELD, VERBASCUM-THAPSUS, TEMPERATE FOREST, EUROPEAN FLORA, WEED SEEDBANK, VEGETATION, SOIL, HISTORY
journal title
SEED SCIENCE RESEARCH
Seed Sci. Res.
volume
19
issue
2
pages
103 - 114
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000266216800005
JCR category
PLANT SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
1.608 (2009)
JCR rank
61/172 (2009)
JCR quartile
2 (2009)
ISSN
0960-2585
DOI
10.1017/S0960258509306662
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
851669
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-851669
date created
2010-02-04 14:03:40
date last changed
2010-02-10 17:42:57
@article{851669,
  abstract     = {Recently, forest seed banks were proven to not only reflect former (decades-old) but also ancient (centuries-old) land use. Yet, as land-use intensity determines the magnitude of seed-bank changes in recent forests, this study aims to identify whether an ancient land-use gradient would also be reflected in the seed bank. On a forested 1600-year-old archaeological site, five different land-use intensities were mapped and sampled. Apart from seed density, species richness and composition, functional seed-bank types, defined by nine seed-bank-related plant traits, were related to the land-use intensity gradient. The land-use gradient from gardens to undisturbed sites was still clearly reflected in the soil seed bank. Six emergent functional seed-bank types, characterized by specific plant traits, changed significantly in abundance, parallel to the land-use gradient. In particular, dispersal agent (and related traits) proved an important explanatory trait of present (functional) seed-bank patterns. Poor dispersers (large and heavy seeds) were not found in the intensively used areas, contrary to animal-dispersed species. Wind-dispersers may have been inhibited in the extension of their distribution by recruitment bottlenecks (low seed production) and/or competitive exclusion. Additionally, the agricultural land-use probably introduced ruderal species into the seed bank of the most intensively used areas, yielding a simultaneous increase in vegetation-seed-bank dissimilarity with land-use intensity, eliminating present vegetation as a driver behind the differences over the seed-bank gradient. We conclude by arguing how coppice-with-standards management possibly maintained the seed-bank gradient.},
  author       = {Plue, Jan and Dupouey, J-L and Verheyen, Kris and Hermy, Martin},
  issn         = {0960-2585},
  journal      = {SEED SCIENCE RESEARCH},
  keyword      = {functional seed-bank types,coppice-with-standards management,Gallo-Roman agriculture,land use,seed-bank pattern,Verbascum thapsus,DECIDUOUS FOREST,LAND-USE,OLD-FIELD,VERBASCUM-THAPSUS,TEMPERATE FOREST,EUROPEAN FLORA,WEED SEEDBANK,VEGETATION,SOIL,HISTORY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {103--114},
  title        = {Forest seed banks along an intensity gradient of ancient agriculture},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0960258509306662},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Plue, Jan, J-L Dupouey, Kris Verheyen, and Martin Hermy. 2009. “Forest Seed Banks Along an Intensity Gradient of Ancient Agriculture.” Seed Science Research 19 (2): 103–114.
APA
Plue, J., Dupouey, J.-L., Verheyen, K., & Hermy, M. (2009). Forest seed banks along an intensity gradient of ancient agriculture. SEED SCIENCE RESEARCH, 19(2), 103–114.
Vancouver
1.
Plue J, Dupouey J-L, Verheyen K, Hermy M. Forest seed banks along an intensity gradient of ancient agriculture. SEED SCIENCE RESEARCH. 2009;19(2):103–14.
MLA
Plue, Jan, J-L Dupouey, Kris Verheyen, et al. “Forest Seed Banks Along an Intensity Gradient of Ancient Agriculture.” SEED SCIENCE RESEARCH 19.2 (2009): 103–114. Print.