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Human dendritic cells in the severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model : their potentiating role in the allergic reaction

(2000) LABORATORY INVESTIGATION. 80(4). p.605-614
Author
Organization
Abstract
Dendritic cells (DCs) are present in the lungs and airways of healthy and allergic subjects where they are exposed to inhaled antigens. After the uptake of antigens, DCs migrate to lymphoid organs where T cells initiate and control the immune response. The migratory properties of DCs are an essential component of their function but remain unclear in the situation of allergic diseases. To better understand the role of DCs in response to allergens, we first investigated their presence in an original experimental model of allergic asthma: the humanized severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse reconstituted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients sensitive to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dpt). Human DCs were detected in lungs of mice developing an inflammatory pulmonary infiltrate and appeared to be mainly located in the alveolar spaces. In a second step, human DCs were generated in vitro from monocytes and injected into naive SCID mice exposed or not exposed to Dpt aerosols. Their migratory behavior was explored, as well as their potential role in modulating the IgE production after exposure to Dpt. After exposure to Dpt, the number of DCs present in airways decreased, while it increased into the spleen and thymus of the mice. The IgE production increased in the presence of DCs as compared with mice not injected with DCs. These results suggest that DCs may play a role in the pulmonary allergic reaction developed in response to Dpt in SCID mice.
Keywords
ADHESION MOLECULES, HUMAN LUNG, SCID MICE, IN-VITRO, EXPRESSION, MIGRATION, IGE, INFLAMMATION, LYMPHOCYTES, ACTIVATION

Citation

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Chicago
Hammad, Hamida, Catherine Duez, Olivier Fahy, Anne Tsicopoulos, Claude Andre, Benoit Wallaert, Serge Lebecque, Andre-Bernard Tonnel, and Joel Pestel. 2000. “Human Dendritic Cells in the Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Mouse Model : Their Potentiating Role in the Allergic Reaction.” Laboratory Investigation 80 (4): 605–614.
APA
Hammad, H., Duez, C., Fahy, O., Tsicopoulos, A., Andre, C., Wallaert, B., Lebecque, S., et al. (2000). Human dendritic cells in the severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model : their potentiating role in the allergic reaction. LABORATORY INVESTIGATION, 80(4), 605–614.
Vancouver
1.
Hammad H, Duez C, Fahy O, Tsicopoulos A, Andre C, Wallaert B, et al. Human dendritic cells in the severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model : their potentiating role in the allergic reaction. LABORATORY INVESTIGATION. 2000;80(4):605–14.
MLA
Hammad, Hamida, Catherine Duez, Olivier Fahy, et al. “Human Dendritic Cells in the Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Mouse Model : Their Potentiating Role in the Allergic Reaction.” LABORATORY INVESTIGATION 80.4 (2000): 605–614. Print.
@article{8515509,
  abstract     = {Dendritic cells (DCs) are present in the lungs and airways of healthy and allergic subjects where they are exposed to inhaled antigens. After the uptake of antigens, DCs migrate to lymphoid organs where T cells initiate and control the immune response. The migratory properties of DCs are an essential component of their function but remain unclear in the situation of allergic diseases. To better understand the role of DCs in response to allergens, we first investigated their presence in an original experimental model of allergic asthma: the humanized severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse reconstituted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients sensitive to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dpt). Human DCs were detected in lungs of mice developing an inflammatory pulmonary infiltrate and appeared to be mainly located in the alveolar spaces. In a second step, human DCs were generated in vitro from monocytes and injected into naive SCID mice exposed or not exposed to Dpt aerosols. Their migratory behavior was explored, as well as their potential role in modulating the IgE production after exposure to Dpt. After exposure to Dpt, the number of DCs present in airways decreased, while it increased into the spleen and thymus of the mice. The IgE production increased in the presence of DCs as compared with mice not injected with DCs. These results suggest that DCs may play a role in the pulmonary allergic reaction developed in response to Dpt in SCID mice.},
  author       = {Hammad, Hamida and Duez, Catherine and Fahy, Olivier and Tsicopoulos, Anne and Andre, Claude and Wallaert, Benoit and Lebecque, Serge and Tonnel, Andre-Bernard and Pestel, Joel},
  issn         = {0023-6837},
  journal      = {LABORATORY INVESTIGATION},
  keyword      = {ADHESION MOLECULES,HUMAN LUNG,SCID MICE,IN-VITRO,EXPRESSION,MIGRATION,IGE,INFLAMMATION,LYMPHOCYTES,ACTIVATION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {605--614},
  title        = {Human dendritic cells in the severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model : their potentiating role in the allergic reaction},
  volume       = {80},
  year         = {2000},
}

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