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Tree species identity shapes earthworm communities

Stephanie Schelfhout UGent, Jan Mertens UGent, Kris Verheyen UGent, Lars Vesterdal, Lander Baeten UGent, Bart Muys and An De Schrijver UGent (2017) FORESTS. 8(3).
abstract
Earthworms are key organisms in forest ecosystems because they incorporate organic material into the soil and affect the activity of other soil organisms. Here, we investigated how tree species affect earthworm communities via litter and soil characteristics. In a 36-year old common garden experiment, replicated six times over Denmark, six tree species were planted in blocks: sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus), beech (Fagus sylvatica), ash (Fraxinus excelsior), Norway spruce (Picea abies), pedunculate oak (Quercus robur) and lime (Tilia cordata). We studied the chemical characteristics of soil and foliar litter, and determined the forest floor turnover rate and the density and biomass of the earthworm species occurring in the stands. Tree species significantly affected earthworm communities via leaf litter and/or soil characteristics. Anecic earthworms were abundant under Fraxinus, Acer and Tilia, which is related to calcium-rich litter and low soil acidification. Epigeic earthworms were indifferent to calcium content in leaf litter and were shown to be mainly related to soil moisture content and litter C:P ratios. Almost no earthworms were found in Picea stands, likely because of the combined effects of recalcitrant litter, low pH and low soil moisture content.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
biogeochemistry, litter quality, soil fauna, soil acidification, plant–soil interactions, biological indicator of soil quality, Oligochaeta, LITTER DECOMPOSITION, COMMON GARDEN, ECOSYSTEM ENGINEERS, TEMPERATE FORESTS, SOIL PROPERTIES, BOREAL FORESTS, BIOMASS, IMPACT, LUMBRICIDAE, DEPOSITION
journal title
FORESTS
Forests
editor
Laurent Augusto
volume
8
issue
3
issue title
Tree species, as major drivers of forest ecosystems functioning
article number
85
pages
20 pages
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000398711600034
ISSN
1999-4907
DOI
doi:10.3390/f8030085
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0)
id
8514667
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8514667
date created
2017-03-17 14:14:33
date last changed
2017-09-08 08:34:54
@article{8514667,
  abstract     = {Earthworms are key organisms in forest ecosystems because they incorporate organic material into the soil and affect the activity of other soil organisms. Here, we investigated how tree species affect earthworm communities via litter and soil characteristics. In a 36-year old common garden experiment, replicated six times over Denmark, six tree species were planted in blocks: sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus), beech (Fagus sylvatica), ash (Fraxinus excelsior), Norway spruce (Picea abies), pedunculate oak (Quercus robur) and lime (Tilia cordata). We studied the chemical characteristics of soil and foliar litter, and determined the forest floor turnover rate and the density and biomass of the earthworm species occurring in the stands. Tree species significantly affected earthworm communities via leaf litter and/or soil characteristics. Anecic earthworms were abundant under Fraxinus, Acer and Tilia, which is related to calcium-rich litter and low soil acidification. Epigeic earthworms were indifferent to calcium content in leaf litter and were shown to be mainly related to soil moisture content and litter C:P ratios. Almost no earthworms were found in Picea stands, likely because of the combined effects of recalcitrant litter, low pH and low soil moisture content. },
  articleno    = {85},
  author       = {Schelfhout, Stephanie and Mertens, Jan and Verheyen, Kris and Vesterdal, Lars and Baeten, Lander and Muys, Bart and De Schrijver, An},
  editor       = {Augusto, Laurent},
  issn         = {1999-4907},
  journal      = {FORESTS},
  keyword      = {biogeochemistry,litter quality,soil fauna,soil acidification,plant--soil interactions,biological indicator of soil quality,Oligochaeta,LITTER DECOMPOSITION,COMMON GARDEN,ECOSYSTEM ENGINEERS,TEMPERATE FORESTS,SOIL PROPERTIES,BOREAL FORESTS,BIOMASS,IMPACT,LUMBRICIDAE,DEPOSITION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {20},
  title        = {Tree species identity shapes earthworm communities},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.3390/f8030085},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2017},
}

Chicago
Schelfhout, Stephanie, Jan Mertens, Kris Verheyen, Lars Vesterdal, Lander Baeten, Bart Muys, and An De Schrijver. 2017. “Tree Species Identity Shapes Earthworm Communities.” Ed. Laurent Augusto. Forests 8 (3).
APA
Schelfhout, S., Mertens, J., Verheyen, K., Vesterdal, L., Baeten, L., Muys, B., & De Schrijver, A. (2017). Tree species identity shapes earthworm communities. (Laurent Augusto, Ed.)FORESTS, 8(3).
Vancouver
1.
Schelfhout S, Mertens J, Verheyen K, Vesterdal L, Baeten L, Muys B, et al. Tree species identity shapes earthworm communities. Augusto L, editor. FORESTS. 2017;8(3).
MLA
Schelfhout, Stephanie, Jan Mertens, Kris Verheyen, et al. “Tree Species Identity Shapes Earthworm Communities.” Ed. Laurent Augusto. FORESTS 8.3 (2017): n. pag. Print.