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Late Quaternary climatic control of Lake Baikal (Russia) turbidite systems : implications for turbidite systems worldwide

Dimitris Evangelinos, C Hans Nelson, Carlota Escutia, Marc De Batist UGent and Oleg Khlystov (2017) GEOLOGY. 45(2). p.179-182
abstract
Lake Baikal (Russia) contains a variety of turbidite systems in different tectonic and depositional settings that provide tests for the role of Quaternary climatic change on turbidite system growth. During Pleistocene glacial climates, all types of systems exhibit increased sediment supply (high sedimentation rates, high net sand percent, thick sand turbidites) and progradation. During Holocene interglacial climate, all systems exhibit reduced sediment supply and retreat. Seismic profiles from the large Selenga Fan and small Tompuda Fan show (1) maximum fan growth during the late Pleistocene glacial melt time, where lobes and large channels reached the distal outer fan, and (2) fan retreat during the transition to the fully developed Holocene interglacial climate. For example, the Selenga Fan surface lobes backstepped ∼55 km from the distal outer fan to the distal inner fan, and the large outer fan surface channel (∼750 m wide, ∼20 m levee relief) evolved to a smaller surface channel (∼450 m wide, ∼13 m levee relief) that extended only to the end of the inner fan. These results show that Quaternary climate controls the growth of the Lake Baikal turbidite systems in a setting where there are no significant water-level changes, which often are cited as the main control on turbidite system growth. The Lake Baikal and other marine turbidite systems suggest that climatic control of sediment supply, unrelated to sea-level lowering and tectonic effects, may have been a much more important control for turbidite systems than previously believed, not only during the Pleistocene, but perhaps also for ancient systems.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
LATE PLEISTOCENE, SEDIMENTATION, SIBERIA, RIFT, PATTERN
journal title
GEOLOGY
Geology
volume
45
issue
2
pages
179 - 182
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000396124600025
ISSN
0091-7613
1943-2682
DOI
10.1130/g38163.1
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
8514482
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8514482
date created
2017-03-15 19:38:48
date last changed
2017-08-02 09:06:36
@article{8514482,
  abstract     = {Lake Baikal (Russia) contains a variety of turbidite systems in different tectonic and depositional settings that provide tests for the role of Quaternary climatic change on turbidite system growth. During Pleistocene glacial climates, all types of systems exhibit increased sediment supply (high sedimentation rates, high net sand percent, thick sand turbidites) and progradation. During Holocene interglacial climate, all systems exhibit reduced sediment supply and retreat. Seismic profiles from the large Selenga Fan and small Tompuda Fan show (1) maximum fan growth during the late Pleistocene glacial melt time, where lobes and large channels reached the distal outer fan, and (2) fan retreat during the transition to the fully developed Holocene interglacial climate. For example, the Selenga Fan surface lobes backstepped \ensuremath{\sim}55 km from the distal outer fan to the distal inner fan, and the large outer fan surface channel (\ensuremath{\sim}750 m wide, \ensuremath{\sim}20 m levee relief) evolved to a smaller surface channel (\ensuremath{\sim}450 m wide, \ensuremath{\sim}13 m levee relief) that extended only to the end of the inner fan. These results show that Quaternary climate controls the growth of the Lake Baikal turbidite systems in a setting where there are no significant water-level changes, which often are cited as the main control on turbidite system growth. The Lake Baikal and other marine turbidite systems suggest that climatic control of sediment supply, unrelated to sea-level lowering and tectonic effects, may have been a much more important control for turbidite systems than previously believed, not only during the Pleistocene, but perhaps also for ancient systems.},
  author       = {Evangelinos, Dimitris and Nelson, C Hans and Escutia, Carlota and De Batist, Marc and Khlystov, Oleg},
  issn         = {0091-7613},
  journal      = {GEOLOGY},
  keyword      = {LATE PLEISTOCENE,SEDIMENTATION,SIBERIA,RIFT,PATTERN},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {179--182},
  title        = {Late Quaternary climatic control of Lake Baikal (Russia) turbidite systems : implications for turbidite systems worldwide},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1130/g38163.1},
  volume       = {45},
  year         = {2017},
}

Chicago
Evangelinos, Dimitris, C Hans Nelson, Carlota Escutia, Marc De Batist, and Oleg Khlystov. 2017. “Late Quaternary Climatic Control of Lake Baikal (Russia) Turbidite Systems : Implications for Turbidite Systems Worldwide.” Geology 45 (2): 179–182.
APA
Evangelinos, D., Nelson, C. H., Escutia, C., De Batist, M., & Khlystov, O. (2017). Late Quaternary climatic control of Lake Baikal (Russia) turbidite systems : implications for turbidite systems worldwide. GEOLOGY, 45(2), 179–182.
Vancouver
1.
Evangelinos D, Nelson CH, Escutia C, De Batist M, Khlystov O. Late Quaternary climatic control of Lake Baikal (Russia) turbidite systems : implications for turbidite systems worldwide. GEOLOGY. 2017;45(2):179–82.
MLA
Evangelinos, Dimitris, C Hans Nelson, Carlota Escutia, et al. “Late Quaternary Climatic Control of Lake Baikal (Russia) Turbidite Systems : Implications for Turbidite Systems Worldwide.” GEOLOGY 45.2 (2017): 179–182. Print.