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Metabolic syndrome in the elderly : an overview of the evidence

(2009) ACTA CLINICA BELGICA. 64(1). p.23-34
Author
Organization
Abstract
We reviewed the literature concerning the prevalence and correlates of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in older adults and assessed the impact of MetS with regard to life expectancy and comorbidity in the elderly (aged 65 years and over). Using the PubMed database and the Cochrane Library, we found 16 eligible studies, of which 8 were prospective cohort studies, 7 cross-sectional studies, and 1 a case-controt study. The World Health Organisation (WHO) and National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) are the most popular definitions to describe MetS experienced by the elderly. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in an elderly population varied from 11% to 43% (median 21 %) according to the WHO, and 23% to 55 % (median 31%) according to NCEP. Obesity and hypertension are the most prevalent individual components. MetS in an elderly population is a proven risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) morbidity, especially stroke and coronary heart disease (CHD), and mortality. Preventing and treating MetS would be useful in preventing disability and promoting normal aging. Results from the different studies of elderly population-based cohorts provide support for earlier investigations in middle-aged populations to prevent MetS components. In conclusion, it is possible to say that the results from the different elderly study populations link the presence of the MetS with the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and functional disability, and further underscore the importance of recognising and treating its individual components, particularly high blood pressure.
Keywords
INSULIN-RESISTANCE SYNDROME, SAN-ANTONIO HEART, CARDIOVASCULAR RISK-FACTORS, CHOLESTEROL EDUCATION-PROGRAM, CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE, INTERNATIONAL-DIABETES-FEDERATION, cardiovascular disease, evidence, elderly, metabolic syndrome, ALL-CAUSE MORTALITY, DIFFERENT DEFINITIONS, OLDER-PEOPLE, CAROTID ATHEROSCLEROSIS

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Chicago
DENYS, KATRIEN, Mustafa Cankurtaran, Wim Janssens, and Mirko Petrovic. 2009. “Metabolic Syndrome in the Elderly : an Overview of the Evidence.” Acta Clinica Belgica 64 (1): 23–34.
APA
DENYS, K., Cankurtaran, M., Janssens, W., & Petrovic, M. (2009). Metabolic syndrome in the elderly : an overview of the evidence. ACTA CLINICA BELGICA, 64(1), 23–34.
Vancouver
1.
DENYS K, Cankurtaran M, Janssens W, Petrovic M. Metabolic syndrome in the elderly : an overview of the evidence. ACTA CLINICA BELGICA. 2009;64(1):23–34.
MLA
DENYS, KATRIEN, Mustafa Cankurtaran, Wim Janssens, et al. “Metabolic Syndrome in the Elderly : an Overview of the Evidence.” ACTA CLINICA BELGICA 64.1 (2009): 23–34. Print.
@article{851241,
  abstract     = {We reviewed the literature concerning the prevalence and correlates of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in older adults and assessed the impact of MetS with regard to life expectancy and comorbidity in the elderly (aged 65 years and over).
Using the PubMed database and the Cochrane Library, we found 16 eligible studies, of which 8 were prospective cohort studies, 7 cross-sectional studies, and 1 a case-controt study.
The World Health Organisation (WHO) and National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) are the most popular definitions to describe MetS experienced by the elderly. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in an elderly population varied from 11\% to 43\% (median 21 \%) according to the WHO, and 23\% to 55 \% (median 31\%) according to NCEP. Obesity and hypertension are the most prevalent individual components. MetS in an elderly population is a proven risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) morbidity, especially stroke and coronary heart disease (CHD), and mortality. Preventing and treating MetS would be useful in preventing disability and promoting normal aging. Results from the different studies of elderly population-based cohorts provide support for earlier investigations in middle-aged populations to prevent MetS components.
In conclusion, it is possible to say that the results from the different elderly study populations link the presence of the MetS with the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and functional disability, and further underscore the importance of recognising and treating its individual components, particularly high blood pressure.},
  author       = {DENYS, KATRIEN and Cankurtaran, Mustafa and Janssens, Wim and Petrovic, Mirko},
  issn         = {0001-5512},
  journal      = {ACTA CLINICA BELGICA},
  keyword      = {INSULIN-RESISTANCE SYNDROME,SAN-ANTONIO HEART,CARDIOVASCULAR RISK-FACTORS,CHOLESTEROL EDUCATION-PROGRAM,CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE,INTERNATIONAL-DIABETES-FEDERATION,cardiovascular disease,evidence,elderly,metabolic syndrome,ALL-CAUSE MORTALITY,DIFFERENT DEFINITIONS,OLDER-PEOPLE,CAROTID ATHEROSCLEROSIS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {23--34},
  title        = {Metabolic syndrome in the elderly : an overview of the evidence},
  volume       = {64},
  year         = {2009},
}

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