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Microstructure of chemically modified wood using X-ray computed tomography in relation to wetting properties

Maziar Sedighi Moghaddam, Jan Van den Bulcke UGent, Magnus EP Wålinder, Per M Claesson, Joris Van Acker UGent and Agne Swerin (2016) HOLZFORSCHUNG. 71(2). p.119-128
abstract
X-ray computed tomography (XCT) was utilized to visualize and quantify the 2D and 3D microstructure of acetylated southern yellow pine (pine) and maple, as well as furfurylated pine samples. The total porosity and the porosity of different cell types, as well as cell wall thickness and maximum opening of tracheid lumens were evaluated. The wetting properties (swelling and capillary uptake) were related to these microstructural characteristics. The data show significant changes in the wood structure for furfurylated pine sapwood samples, including a change in tracheid shape and filling of tracheids by furan polymer. In contrast, no such changes were noted for the acetylated pine samples at the high resolution of 0.8 mu m. The XCT images obtained for the furfurylated maple samples demonstrated that all ray cells and some vessel elements were filled with furan polymer while the fibers largely remained unchanged. Furfurylation significantly decreased the total porosity of both the maple and pine samples. Furthermore, this was observed in both earlywood (EW) and latewood (LW) regions in the pine samples. In contrast, the total porosity of pine samples was hardly affected by acetylation. These findings are in line with wetting results demonstrating that furfurylation reduces both swelling and capillary uptake in contrast to acetylation which reduces mostly swelling. Furfurylation significantly increased the cell wall thickness of both the maple and pine samples, especially at higher levels of furfurylation.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
acetylation, cell wall thickness, furfurylation, hardwood, microstructure, porosity, softwood, sub-micron X-ray computed tomography, tracheid, wettability, MOISTURE DYNAMICS, MICROTOMOGRAPHY, QUANTIFICATION, FIBERBOARD
journal title
HOLZFORSCHUNG
Holzforschung
volume
71
issue
2
pages
119 - 128
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000394124800004
JCR category
MATERIALS SCIENCE, PAPER & WOOD
JCR impact factor
1.868 (2016)
JCR rank
2/21 (2016)
JCR quartile
1 (2016)
ISSN
0018-3830
1437-434X
DOI
10.1515/hf-2015-0227
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
8512128
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8512128
date created
2017-03-02 12:28:51
date last changed
2017-05-22 09:50:09
@article{8512128,
  abstract     = {X-ray computed tomography (XCT) was utilized to visualize and quantify the 2D and 3D microstructure of acetylated southern yellow pine (pine) and maple, as well as furfurylated pine samples. The total porosity and the porosity of different cell types, as well as cell wall thickness and maximum opening of tracheid lumens were evaluated. The wetting properties (swelling and capillary uptake) were related to these microstructural characteristics. The data show significant changes in the wood structure for furfurylated pine sapwood samples, including a change in tracheid shape and filling of tracheids by furan polymer. In contrast, no such changes were noted for the acetylated pine samples at the high resolution of 0.8 mu m. The XCT images obtained for the furfurylated maple samples demonstrated that all ray cells and some vessel elements were filled with furan polymer while the fibers largely remained unchanged. Furfurylation significantly decreased the total porosity of both the maple and pine samples. Furthermore, this was observed in both earlywood (EW) and latewood (LW) regions in the pine samples. In contrast, the total porosity of pine samples was hardly affected by acetylation. These findings are in line with wetting results demonstrating that furfurylation reduces both swelling and capillary uptake in contrast to acetylation which reduces mostly swelling. Furfurylation significantly increased the cell wall thickness of both the maple and pine samples, especially at higher levels of furfurylation.},
  author       = {Sedighi Moghaddam, Maziar and Van den Bulcke, Jan and W{\aa}linder, Magnus EP and Claesson, Per M and Van Acker, Joris and Swerin, Agne},
  issn         = {0018-3830},
  journal      = {HOLZFORSCHUNG},
  keyword      = {acetylation,cell wall thickness,furfurylation,hardwood,microstructure,porosity,softwood,sub-micron X-ray computed tomography,tracheid,wettability,MOISTURE DYNAMICS,MICROTOMOGRAPHY,QUANTIFICATION,FIBERBOARD},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {119--128},
  title        = {Microstructure of chemically modified wood using X-ray computed tomography in relation to wetting properties},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/hf-2015-0227},
  volume       = {71},
  year         = {2016},
}

Chicago
Sedighi Moghaddam, Maziar, Jan Van den Bulcke, Magnus EP Wålinder, Per M Claesson, Joris Van Acker, and Agne Swerin. 2016. “Microstructure of Chemically Modified Wood Using X-ray Computed Tomography in Relation to Wetting Properties.” Holzforschung 71 (2): 119–128.
APA
Sedighi Moghaddam, M., Van den Bulcke, J., Wålinder, M. E., Claesson, P. M., Van Acker, J., & Swerin, A. (2016). Microstructure of chemically modified wood using X-ray computed tomography in relation to wetting properties. HOLZFORSCHUNG, 71(2), 119–128.
Vancouver
1.
Sedighi Moghaddam M, Van den Bulcke J, Wålinder ME, Claesson PM, Van Acker J, Swerin A. Microstructure of chemically modified wood using X-ray computed tomography in relation to wetting properties. HOLZFORSCHUNG. 2016;71(2):119–28.
MLA
Sedighi Moghaddam, Maziar, Jan Van den Bulcke, Magnus EP Wålinder, et al. “Microstructure of Chemically Modified Wood Using X-ray Computed Tomography in Relation to Wetting Properties.” HOLZFORSCHUNG 71.2 (2016): 119–128. Print.