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Funerary culture in hellenistic Chiusi : a socio-cultural shift towards less expenditure and ostentatious display

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Abstract
From the end of the third century BC on, the funerary culture of the Etruscan city of Chiusi saw the gradual disappearance of the most expensive containers and tombs. At the same time, there was first a dramatic increase in the number of such monuments, followed by an equally sharp decline in the first century BC. The qualitative development has traditionally been explained using sumptuary laws, which should have constrained funerary expenditure. However, a close examination of the local evidence reveals that this is not only unlikely, but also does not explain the quantitative development and why there was a social and cultural need to constrain these funerary objects in the first place. Using the concepts of distinction and habitus developed by Bourdieu, this paper analyses the developments in Chiusine funerary practice by focusing on social interactions within and between elites and non-elites. This gives both groups agency in a complex social, cultural and political process that caused the criteria for distinction to change, ultimately making funerary culture less important for status differentiation in the rapidly changing context of Hellenistic Italy.
Keywords
Etruria, Etruscan, Chiusi, Clusium, Romanisation, Romanization, funerary, habitus, distinction, Italy, Hellenistic

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Chicago
Daveloose, Alexis. 2019. “Funerary Culture in Hellenistic Chiusi : a Socio-cultural Shift Towards Less Expenditure and Ostentatious Display.” Ed. Mark Bradley. Papers of the British School at Rome.
APA
Daveloose, A. (2019). Funerary culture in hellenistic Chiusi : a socio-cultural shift towards less expenditure and ostentatious display. (M. Bradley, Ed.)PAPERS OF THE BRITISH SCHOOL AT ROME.
Vancouver
1.
Daveloose A. Funerary culture in hellenistic Chiusi : a socio-cultural shift towards less expenditure and ostentatious display. Bradley M, editor. PAPERS OF THE BRITISH SCHOOL AT ROME. Cambridge University Press; 2019;
MLA
Daveloose, Alexis. “Funerary Culture in Hellenistic Chiusi : a Socio-cultural Shift Towards Less Expenditure and Ostentatious Display.” Ed. Mark Bradley. PAPERS OF THE BRITISH SCHOOL AT ROME (2019): n. pag. Print.
@article{8511677,
  abstract     = {From the end of the third century BC on, the funerary culture of the Etruscan city of Chiusi saw the gradual disappearance of the most expensive containers and tombs. At the same time, there was first a dramatic increase in the number of such monuments, followed by an equally sharp decline in the first century BC. The qualitative development has traditionally been explained using sumptuary laws, which should have constrained funerary expenditure. However, a close examination of the local evidence reveals that this is not only unlikely, but also does not explain the quantitative development and why there was a social and cultural need to constrain these funerary objects in the first place. Using the concepts of distinction and habitus developed by Bourdieu, this paper analyses the developments in Chiusine funerary practice by focusing on social interactions within and between elites and non-elites. This gives both groups agency in a complex social, cultural and political process that caused the criteria for distinction to change, ultimately making funerary culture less important for status differentiation in the rapidly changing context of Hellenistic Italy.},
  author       = {Daveloose, Alexis},
  editor       = {Bradley, Mark},
  issn         = {0068-2462},
  journal      = {PAPERS OF THE BRITISH SCHOOL AT ROME},
  keywords     = {Etruria,Etruscan,Chiusi,Clusium,Romanisation,Romanization,funerary,habitus,distinction,Italy,Hellenistic},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Cambridge University Press},
  title        = {Funerary culture in hellenistic Chiusi : a socio-cultural shift towards less expenditure and ostentatious display},
  year         = {2019},
}