Advanced search
1 file | 560.20 KB Add to list

Melanoma-associated leukoderma and vitiligo cannot be differentiated based on blinded assessment by experts in the field

Author
Organization
Abstract
Background: Melanoma-associated leukoderma (MAL) is a depigmenting disorder that can occur spontaneously in patients with melanoma. The differences in clinical presentation between MAL and vitiligo are not well defined. This may lead to misdiagnosing MAL as vitiligo, resulting in delayed detection of melanoma. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess whether experts in the field can distinguish between MAL and vitiligo, and to assess if discriminative features can be identified. Methods: We designed an image comparison study in which 4 experts in the field blindly assessed photographs followed by medical history of 11 patients with MAL and 33 with vitiligo. Results: The assessors misdiagnosed 72.7% of MAL cases and marked 80.0% of them as typical vitiligo. The median age at onset of the leukoderma was higher (55 years, P = .001) in MAL. No discriminative features were found. Limitations: Sampling bias because of inclusion in tertiary referral center is a limitation. Conclusion: The clinical presentation of leukoderma in patients with melanoma resembles that of vitiligo. We propose "melanoma-associated vitiligo" as the more appropriate term for leukoderma in patients with melanoma. Clinicians should be aware that depigmentation in vitiligo can also be caused by melanoma-associated vitiligo and a total body inspection should be performed.
Keywords
clinical presentation, depigmentation, diagnostic accuracy, melanoma, melanoma-associated hypopigmentation, melanoma-associated leukoderma, melanoma-associated vitiligo, vitiligo, METASTATIC MELANOMA, SIGN

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 560.20 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Lommerts, Janny E et al. “Melanoma-associated Leukoderma and Vitiligo Cannot Be Differentiated Based on Blinded Assessment by Experts in the Field.” JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY 75.6 (2016): 1198–1204. Print.
APA
Lommerts, J. E., Teulings, H.-E., Ezzedine, K., van Geel, N., Hartmann, A., Speeckaert, R., Spuls, P. I., et al. (2016). Melanoma-associated leukoderma and vitiligo cannot be differentiated based on blinded assessment by experts in the field. JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY, 75(6), 1198–1204.
Chicago author-date
Lommerts, Janny E, Hansje-Eva Teulings, Khaled Ezzedine, Nanja van Geel, Anke Hartmann, Reinhart Speeckaert, Phyllis I Spuls, Albert Wolkerstorfer, Rosalie M Luiten, and Marcel W Bekkenk. 2016. “Melanoma-associated Leukoderma and Vitiligo Cannot Be Differentiated Based on Blinded Assessment by Experts in the Field.” Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 75 (6): 1198–1204.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Lommerts, Janny E, Hansje-Eva Teulings, Khaled Ezzedine, Nanja van Geel, Anke Hartmann, Reinhart Speeckaert, Phyllis I Spuls, Albert Wolkerstorfer, Rosalie M Luiten, and Marcel W Bekkenk. 2016. “Melanoma-associated Leukoderma and Vitiligo Cannot Be Differentiated Based on Blinded Assessment by Experts in the Field.” Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 75 (6): 1198–1204.
Vancouver
1.
Lommerts JE, Teulings H-E, Ezzedine K, van Geel N, Hartmann A, Speeckaert R, et al. Melanoma-associated leukoderma and vitiligo cannot be differentiated based on blinded assessment by experts in the field. JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY. 2016;75(6):1198–204.
IEEE
[1]
J. E. Lommerts et al., “Melanoma-associated leukoderma and vitiligo cannot be differentiated based on blinded assessment by experts in the field,” JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY, vol. 75, no. 6, pp. 1198–1204, 2016.
@article{8511377,
  abstract     = {Background: Melanoma-associated leukoderma (MAL) is a depigmenting disorder that can occur spontaneously in patients with melanoma. The differences in clinical presentation between MAL and vitiligo are not well defined. This may lead to misdiagnosing MAL as vitiligo, resulting in delayed detection of melanoma. 
Objective: The objective of this study was to assess whether experts in the field can distinguish between MAL and vitiligo, and to assess if discriminative features can be identified. 
Methods: We designed an image comparison study in which 4 experts in the field blindly assessed photographs followed by medical history of 11 patients with MAL and 33 with vitiligo. 
Results: The assessors misdiagnosed 72.7% of MAL cases and marked 80.0% of them as typical vitiligo. The median age at onset of the leukoderma was higher (55 years, P = .001) in MAL. No discriminative features were found. 
Limitations: Sampling bias because of inclusion in tertiary referral center is a limitation. 
Conclusion: The clinical presentation of leukoderma in patients with melanoma resembles that of vitiligo. We propose "melanoma-associated vitiligo" as the more appropriate term for leukoderma in patients with melanoma. Clinicians should be aware that depigmentation in vitiligo can also be caused by melanoma-associated vitiligo and a total body inspection should be performed.},
  author       = {Lommerts, Janny E and Teulings, Hansje-Eva and Ezzedine, Khaled and van Geel, Nanja and Hartmann, Anke and Speeckaert, Reinhart and Spuls, Phyllis I and Wolkerstorfer, Albert and Luiten, Rosalie M and Bekkenk, Marcel W},
  issn         = {0190-9622},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY},
  keywords     = {clinical presentation,depigmentation,diagnostic accuracy,melanoma,melanoma-associated hypopigmentation,melanoma-associated leukoderma,melanoma-associated vitiligo,vitiligo,METASTATIC MELANOMA,SIGN},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1198--1204},
  title        = {Melanoma-associated leukoderma and vitiligo cannot be differentiated based on blinded assessment by experts in the field},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2016.07.060},
  volume       = {75},
  year         = {2016},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: